oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Is nurses' self-esteem interwoven with patients' achievements? The concept of patient-invested contingent self-esteem
University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
Department of developmental, personality and social psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3080-8716
University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; VIVES University College - Department Health Care, Roeselare, Belgium.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To explore the notion of Patient-invested Contingent Self-Esteem (Pa-CSE) and investigate its association to nurses' self-reported engagement in controlling or autonomy-supportive interactions with chronic care patients.

BACKGROUND: Considering the high number of patients sub-optimally managing their chronic condition, nurses might experience a drop and rise in self-worth when patients fail and succeed, respectively, in managing their chronic condition. This dynamic has not received prior research attention.

DESIGN: Multivariate analysis employing cross-sectional data according to STROBE guidelines.

METHODS: Self-reports among nurses employed in chronic care (N=394) from eight randomly selected hospitals in Belgium. Exploratory factor analysis and stepwise linear regression analyses were conducted.

RESULTS: Success-based and failure-based orientations could be distinguished and refer to nurses' tendency to associate, respectively, patients' successes with feelings of professional success and self-worth and patients' failures with feelings of professional failure, shame, and inadequacy. Nurses' self-esteem is fairly interwoven with patients' achievements in the management of their chronic condition. A success-based orientation was positively related to autonomy-supportive care in case a failure-based orientation was low. Nurses with a simultaneous success-based and failure-based orientation interacted in a more controlling way.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that basing one's self-worth on patients' accomplishments may be a double-edged sword. Although tying one's personal glory to the successes of one's patient is related to greater patient participation and support of autonomy, these effects only emerge if nurses' self-worth is not interwoven with patients' failures. In fact, having both success- and failure-oriented contingent self-worth is related to a more pressuring approach.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: To prevent nurses from developing inferior professional feelings when their patients fail to manage their condition, a reflective stance towards the impact of patients' behaviour on the nurses' professional feeling of (in)adequacy is an important step to deal with such situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Care relationship, Pa-CSE, Self-Determination Theory, chronic condition, contingent self-esteem, nursing, patient-invested contingent self-esteem, professional self-esteem, self-management
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75595DOI: 10.1111/jocn.14994PubMedID: 31294505OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-75595DiVA, id: diva2:1343941
Available from: 2019-08-19 Created: 2019-08-19 Last updated: 2019-08-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Beeckman, Dimitri

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Beeckman, Dimitri
By organisation
School of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Clinical Nursing
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 7 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf