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The Link Between Diet, Gut Microbiota And Type 2Diabetes/Pre-diabetes In Humans: - A systematic review
Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
2019 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Diabetes is a global and rapidly increasing disease that in 2014 affected morethan 422 million people, and takes 1,2 million lives per year. The importance of identifyingnew ways to manage and prevent the disease has led science to a new area – modulation ofthe gut microbiota. It is well known that the composition of gut microbiota differs betweennon-diabetic and diabetic adults, and that nutrition is the main way to modulate gutmicrobiota composition. Food and lifestyle are of great importance for the development andtreatment of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes, but less is known about whether gut microbiotamodulation is mediating that link.

Aim: The aim is to examine whether there is a scientifically well-supported link between diet,gut microbiota and the development or treatment of type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes in humans.

Methods: Systematic review with literature search via PubMed and Cochrane, following themanual from the Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment ofSocial Services (SBU).

Results: Of 12 articles finally included, two studies found a strong impact of diet on diabetesrelatedvariables via modulation of gut microbiota. Another four studies did not find anassociation, and six studies lacked sufficient data to be able to draw a conclusion. Dietinterventions and study design differed between studies, which led to heterogeneous results.

Conclusions: This review demonstrates a large knowledge gap in how dietary modificationscan prevent or treat type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes via changes in gut microbiota.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
systematic review, human, gut microbiota, type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-76217OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-76217DiVA, id: diva2:1350211
Subject / course
Medicine
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf