oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Adolescent and adult implications of girls’ pubertal timing
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7456-2397
2012 (English)In: Girls at risk: Swedish longitudinal research on adjustment / [ed] Anna-Karin Andershed, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012, p. 9-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Puberty is a milestone in female development. It is the process through which girls become capable of sexual reproduction and during which major physical changes occur. Puberty is often viewed as one of girls’ troubles. In fact, pubertal development is linked with adjustment in many areas of life, with pubertal timing—when in relation to same-sex, same-age peers a girl experiences puberty—being associated with adjustment difficulties in particular. According to a substantial literature, puberty appears to be troublesome mostly for girls who mature early. Despite being vast, the literature has important limitations, including a lack of comprehensive models placing girls in their contexts and a considerable lack of long-term follow-ups. In this chapter, the role of pubertal timing in adolescent and adult adjustment is studied in a broader developmental context using a cohort of children from a middle-size urban Swedish community who have been followed across 33 years within the Individual Development and Adaptation program. Biological (puberty), psychological (self-perceptions), and environmental (heterosexual relationships) factors are examined simultaneously. The findings suggest that early puberty is associated with adjustment difficulties in several areas, but when pubertal timing is considered in conjunction with psychological and social factors, a more differentiated picture emerge. Certain subgroups of early-developing females might be among those who show the most positive adjustment. From a long-term perspective, pubertal timing continues to in some respects play a role in adulthood. In conclusion, early-developing girls need not be at risk girls. Rather, neglecting to view pubertal timing in its context likely masks that different early-developing girls have different patterns of adjustment in adolescence and, in addition, different developmental paths to adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2012. p. 9-34
Series
Advancing responsible adolescent development
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2953ISBN: 978-1-4614-4129-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-2953DiVA, id: diva2:135767
Available from: 2008-03-24 Created: 2008-03-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Skoog, Therése

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Skoog, Therése
By organisation
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 259 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf