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The effect of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation in users with stroke
Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3437-0590
Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
2006 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose.Persons with disabilities after stroke are often restricted in activity and participation in society because of mobility limitations. An outdoor powered wheelchair may be one among other interventions in a rehabilitation programme. The aim of this study was to describe and compare activity limitations and participation restrictions in persons with stroke from their own perspective, before and after using an outdoor powered wheelchair. Method. At baseline and follow-up two instruments were used: Individually Prioritized Problem Assessment (IPPA) and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II). Results. The results indicated that the powered wheelchair has a great positive effect on activity and participation assessed with IPPA. The results also showed that most of the participants' problems could be categorised as belonging to the domain of 'Community, social and civic life' according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the effect size in this domain was large (2.4) after the participants had used the wheelchair. Conclusion. An outdoor powered wheelchair is an essential device for persons with disability after stroke with regard to overcoming activity limitations and participation restrictions in everyday life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxford, UK: Taylor & Francis , 2006. Vol. 1, no 4, p. 235-243
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3073DOI: 10.1080/17483100600757841OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-3073DiVA, id: diva2:136828
Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. The significance of assistive devices in the daily life of persons with stroke and their spouses
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The significance of assistive devices in the daily life of persons with stroke and their spouses
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Betydelsen av hjälpmedel i vardagslivet för personer med stroke och deras närstående
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this research project was to explore and describe the significance of assistive devices in daily life. The project involves two qualitative and two quantitative studies. Three of these studies were from the perspective of persons with stroke and one from the perspective of spouses of persons with stroke.

A hermeneutic phenomenological lifeworld approach was used in the qualitative studies and data was obtained through conversational interviews with the two study groups, 22 persons with stroke and 12 spouses of persons with stroke, after the devices had been used for about a year.

The results indicated that the lived experiences of assistive devices in respect of the different lifeworld existentials (lived body, lived space, lived time, lived human relation) are closely interconnected in both study groups. The lived body existential included aspects of habits, feelings and the incorporation, figuratively speaking, of the devices into their own bodies. Lived space concerned the gradual development of a new view of the environment and the devices’ role as a prerequisite for being able to live at home. The devices brought about a changed relation to lived time with respect to the temporal perspectives of past, present and future. To be able to take control of one’s own time was an important experience that the devices facilitated. Assistive devices were an integral part of the lived human relation between the couples in the study groups, as well as between the disabled persons/spouses and other people, including the health-care professionals. The devices contributed either to the maintenance or the change of social roles, but they sometimes also gave rise to the experience of being stigmatised. The results in the case of both study groups showed that the use of different devices is complex and often contradictory, especially when it comes to persons with stroke. Overall the persons’ experiences of the advantages of the devices overshadowed their experiences of the disadvantages.

The quantitative studies included a pre- and post-assessment design. Thirty-two persons with disabilities after stroke were included. The impact of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation (IPPA, WHODAS II) and quality of life (PIADS, EQ-5D) was measured. Statistical analysis with mainly non-parametric tests was used to determine significant within-group and between-group changes after intervention. The conceptual framework ICF was used in one of the quantitative studies when classifying the participants’ stated problems.

The results showed that the outdoor powered wheelchair is an essential device for persons with disabilities after stroke with regard to overcoming activity limitation and participation restrictions in everyday life. Furthermore it mostly has a positive impact on such users’ quality of life. However, it is also important to highlight the negative experiences of a few with regard to the use of powered wheelchairs. In sum, these results will enable prescribers to better understand the individual experiences of using assistive devices and the individuals’ and the families’ need for support in connection with the prescription of assistive devices, the particular example being powered wheelchairs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek, 2006. p. 95
Series
Örebro Studies in Care Sciences, ISSN 1652-1153 ; 8
Keyword
stroke, spouse, next of kin, assistive devices, assistive technology, powered wheelchair, lifeworld, phenomenology, lived experience, activity, participation, quality of life, outcome, ICF, IPPA, WHODAS II, PIADS, Euroqol-5D, occupational therapy
National Category
Nursing Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-460 (URN)91-7668-485-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2006-06-02, Hörsal P 2, Prismahuset, Örebro universitet, Örebro, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Pettersson, IngvorAhlström, Gerd

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