oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Fear of falling in stroke patients: relationship with previous falls and functional characteristics
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 261-264Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between fear of falling and functional characteristics of patients after stroke as well as to determine what characterizes fallers who score high fall-related self-efficacy, and nonfallers who score low fall-related self-efficacy. Patients (n=140) treated in a stroke unit during a 12-month period were included. On follow-up, fallers were identified and patients answered the questions in the Falls Efficacy Scale, Swedish version (FES-S). Assessments of motor capacity, functional mobility and balance were also made. In univariate analysis, low fall-related self-efficacy was significantly associated with increased age, female sex, earlier falls, visual and cognitive impairment, low mood and impaired physical function. In multivariate analysis, only earlier falls and physical function remained significant. Twenty percent of the patients scored low fall-related self-efficacy without having experienced a fall, and 11% who experienced a fall scored high fall-related self-efficacy. Impaired physical function was significantly associated with scoring low fall-related self-efficacy, for both fallers and nonfallers. Fear of falling is significantly associated with poor physical function and earlier falls. Falls Efficacy Scale, Swedish version could add useful information to a fall risk analysis. Patients scoring low fall-related self-efficacy should be offered fall prevention measures whether they have fallen or not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 31, no 3, p. 261-264
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3400DOI: 10.1097/MRR.0b013e3282fba390PubMedID: 18708851OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-3400DiVA, id: diva2:137697
Available from: 2008-12-04 Created: 2008-12-04 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=18708851&dopt=Citation

Authority records BETA

Kamwendo, KittyAppelros, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kamwendo, KittyAppelros, Peter
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences
In the same journal
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Social Sciences InterdisciplinaryNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 126 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf