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Cultured milk, yogurt, and dairy intake in relation to bladder cancer risk in a prospective study of Swedish women and men
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
2008 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 1083-1087Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:Findings from epidemiologic studies of the effect of dairy foods (mainly milk) on the risk of bladder cancer have been inconsistent.

Objective:We aimed to examine the association between the intake of cultured milk and other dairy foods and the incidence of bladder cancer in a prospective, population-based cohort.

Design:We prospectively followed 82 002 Swedish women and men who were cancer-free and who completed a 96-item food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. Incident cases of bladder cancer were identified in the Swedish cancer registries.

Results:During a mean follow-up of 9.4 y, 485 participants (76 women and 409 men) were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Total dairy intake was not significantly associated with risk of bladder cancer [7.0 servings/d compared with < 3.5 servings/d: multivariate rate ratio (RR) = 0.87; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.15; P for trend = 0.33]. However, a statistically significant inverse association was observed for the intake of cultured milk (sour milk and yogurt). The multivariate RRs for the highest category of cultured milk intake (2 servings/d) compared with the lowest category (0 serving/d) were 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.85; P for trend = 0.006) in women and men combined, 0.55 (95% CI: 0.25, 1.22; P for trend = 0.06) in women, and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.89; P for trend = 0.03) in men. The intake of milk or cheese was not associated with bladder cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bethseda, Md.: American Society for Nutrition , 2008. Vol. 88, no 4, p. 1083-1087
Keywords [en]
Cohort Studies, Cultured Milk Products, Dairy Products, Diet, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Prospective Studies, Questionnaires, Registries, Risk Factors, Sweden/epidemiology, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Surgery Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3662PubMedID: 18842797OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-3662DiVA, id: diva2:137960
Available from: 2008-12-17 Created: 2008-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Swen-OlofJohansson, Jan-Erik

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