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Spleen enlargement and genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum infection in two ethnic groups with different malaria susceptibility in Mali, West Africa
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2006 (English)In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, ISSN 0035-9203, E-ISSN 1878-3503, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 248-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The high resistance to malaria in the nomadic Fulani population needs further understanding. The ability to cope with multiclonal Plasmodium falciparum infections was assessed in a cross-sectional survey in the Fulani and the Dogon, their sympatric ethnic group in Mali. The Fulani had lower parasite prevalence and densities and more prominent spleen enlargement. Spleen rates in children aged 2–9 years were 75% in the Fulani and 44% in the Dogon (P < 0.001). There was no difference in number of P. falciparum genotypes, defined by merozoite surface protein 2 polymorphism, with mean values of 2.25 and 2.11 (P = 0.503) in the Dogon and Fulani, respectively. Spleen rate increased with parasite prevalence, density and number of co-infecting clones in asymptomatic Dogon. Moreover, splenomegaly was increased in individuals with clinical malaria in the Dogon, odds ratio 3.67 (95% CI 1.65–8.15, P = 0.003), but not found in the Fulani, 1.36 (95% CI 0.53–3.48, P = 0.633). The more susceptible Dogon population thus appear to respond with pronounced spleen enlargement to asymptomatic multiclonal infections and acute disease whereas the Fulani have generally enlarged spleens already functional for protection. The results emphasize the importance of spleen function in protective immunity to the polymorphic malaria parasite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier , 2006. Vol. 100, no 3, p. 248-257
Keywords [en]
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Animals, Antigens; Protozoan/genetics, Child, Child; Preschool, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Cross-Sectional Studies, Disease Susceptibility, Genetic Variation/genetics, Humans, Infant, Infant; Newborn, Malaria; Falciparum/*ethnology/parasitology, Mali, Middle Aged, Plasmodium falciparum/*genetics, Protozoan Proteins/genetics, Splenomegaly/*ethnology/parasitology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Infectious Medicine
Research subject
Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3796DOI: 10.1016/j.trstmh.2005.03.011PubMedID: 16298405OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-3796DiVA, id: diva2:138094
Available from: 2009-01-05 Created: 2009-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Montgomery, Scott M.

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