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High cardiovascular fitness is associated with low metabolic risk score in children: the European Youth Heart Study
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2007 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 350-355Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to examine the associations of cardiovascular fitness (CVF) with a clustering of metabolic risk factors in children, and to examine whether there is a CVF level associated with a low metabolic risk. CVF was estimated by a maximal ergometer bike test on 873 randomly selected children from Sweden and Estonia. Additional measured outcomes included fasting insulin, glucose, triglycerides, HDLC, blood pressure, and the sum of five skinfolds. A metabolic risk score was computed as the mean of the standardized outcomes scores. A risk score <75th percentile was considered to indicate a low metabolic risk. CVF was negatively associated with clustering of metabolic risk factors in children. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed a significant discriminatory accuracy of CVF in identifying the low/high metabolic risk in girls and boys (p < 0.001). The CVF level for a low metabolic risk was 37.0 and 42.1 mL/kg/min in girls and boys, respectively. These levels are similar to the health-related threshold values of CVF suggested by worldwide recognized organizations. In conclusion, the results suggest a hypothetical CVF level for having a low metabolic risk, which should be further tested in longitudinal and/or intervention studies. Abbreviations: AUC, area under the curve CVF, cardiovascular fitness ROC, receiver operating characteristic

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Baltimore, Md: Williams and Wilkins Co , 2007. Vol. 61, no 3, p. 350-355
Keywords [en]
Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology/physiopathology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Europe, Exercise Test, Female, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome X/etiology/physiopathology, Physical Fitness/*physiology, Risk Factors
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Clinical Medicine Pediatrics Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Research subject
Pediatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4209DOI: 10.1203/pdr.0b013e318030d1bdPubMedID: 17314696OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-4209DiVA, id: diva2:138508
Available from: 2007-12-05 Created: 2007-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed&cmd=Retrieve&list_uids=17314696&dopt=Citation

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Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita

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