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The likely impact of elevated [CO2], nitrogen deposition, increased temperature and management on carbon sequestration in temperate and boreal forest ecosystems: a literature review
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2007 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 173, no 3, p. 463-480Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Temperate and boreal forest ecosystems contain a large part of the carbon stored on land, in the form of both biomass and soil organic matter. Increasing atmospheric [CO2], increasing temperature, elevated nitrogen deposition and intensified management will change this C store. Well documented single-factor responses of net primary production are: higher photosynthetic rate (the main [CO2] response); increasing length of growing season (the main temperature response); and higher leaf-area index (the main N deposition and partly [CO2] response). Soil organic matter will increase with increasing litter input, although priming may decrease the soil C stock initially, but litter quality effects should be minimal (response to [CO2], N deposition, and temperature); will decrease because of increasing temperature; and will increase because of retardation of decomposition with N deposition, although the

rate of decomposition of high-quality litter can be increased and that of low-quality litter decreased. Single-factor responses can be misleading because of interactions between factors, in particular those between N and other factors, and indirect effects such as increased N availability from temperature-induced decomposition. In the long term the strength of feedbacks, for example the increasing demand for N from increased growth, will dominate over short-term responses to single factors. However, management has considerable potential for controlling the C store.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 2007. Vol. 173, no 3, p. 463-480
Keyword [en]
carbon balance, carbon, dioxide (CO2), climate change, fertilization, global warming.
National Category
Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4240DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01967.xPubMedID: 17244042OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-4240DiVA, id: diva2:138539
Available from: 2007-12-07 Created: 2007-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01967.x

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Ekblad, Alf

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