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Nitrogen acquisition from inorganic and organic sources by boreal forest plants in the field
Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4384-5014
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2003 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 137, no 2, p. 252-257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A wide range of recent studies have indicated that organic nitrogen may be of great importance to plant nitrogen (N) nutrition. Most of these studies have, however, been conducted in laboratory settings, excluding important factors for actual plant uptake, such as competition, mycorrhizal associations and soil interactions. In order to accurately evaluate the importance of different N compounds to plant N nutrition, field studies are crucial. In this study, we investigated short- as well as long-term plant nitrogen uptake by Deschampsia flexuosa, Picea abies and Vaccinium myrtillus from 15NO3-, 15NH4+ and (U-13C, 15N) arginine, glycine or peptides. Root N uptake was analysed after 6 h and 64 days following injections. Our results show that all three species, irrespective of their type of associated mycorrhiza (arbuscular, ecto- or ericoid, respectively) rapidly acquired similar amounts of N from the entire range of added N sources. After 64 days, P. abies and V. myrtillus had acquired similar amounts of N from all N sources, while for D. flexuosa, the uptake from all N sources except ammonium was significantly lower than that from nitrate. Furthermore, soil analyses indicate that glycine was rapidly decarboxylated after injections, while other organic compounds exhibited slower turnover. In all, these results suggest that a wide range of N compounds may be of importance for the N nutrition of these boreal forest plants, and that the type of mycorrhiza may be of great importance for N scavenging, but less important to the N uptake capacity of plants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 137, no 2, p. 252-257
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4245DOI: 10.1007/s00442-003-1334-0PubMedID: 12883986OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-4245DiVA, id: diva2:138544
Available from: 2007-12-07 Created: 2007-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Ekblad, Alf

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