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Is good 'quality of life' possible at the end of life?: An explorative study of the experiences of a group of cancer patients in two different care cultures
Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3702-3831
Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
2001 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 550-562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper was to explore how a group of gravely ill patients, cared for in different care cultures, assessed their quality of life during their last month of life.* The study material comprised quality of life assessments from 47 cancer patients, completed during their last month of life. Two quality of life questionnaires, the EORTC QLQ-C30 and a psychosocial well-being questionnaire, were used. The data were treated in accordance with instructions for the respective questionnaires, and the results are presented primarily as means, mostly at the group level. Assessments from patients in two different care cultures, care-orientated and cure-orientated, were compared.* The results show that despite having an assessed lower quality of life in many dimensions than people in general, several patients experienced happiness and satisfaction during their last month of life.* 'Cognitive functioning' and 'emotional functioning' were the dimensions that differed least from those of the general population, and 'physical functioning', 'role functioning' and 'global health status/quality of life' differed the most. 'Fatigue' showed the highest mean for the symptom scales/items.* There was a tendency for those cared for in the cure-orientated care culture to report more symptoms than those in the care-orientated care culture. An exception to this was 'pain', which was reported more often by those in the care-orientated care culture.* The implications of the results are discussed from different angles. The significance of knowledge concerning how patients experience their quality of life is also discussed with respect to the care and the planning of care for dying patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 10, no 4, p. 550-562
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4542DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2702.2001.00511.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-4542DiVA, id: diva2:138841
Available from: 2008-04-14 Created: 2008-04-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Sahlberg-Blom, EvaTernestedt, Britt-Marie

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