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The inspector's dilemma under regulated self-regulation
Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5683-179X
2006 (English)In: Policy and Pratice in Health and Safety, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 3-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Regulated self-regulation (RSR) as the main strategy for regulation in the occupational health and security (OHS) field, and the expansion of the work environment concept to include work organisation and psychosocial health, requires that the inspection authority revaluate old methods of inspection work and develop new ones. Of vital importance here is the question of the so called inspector’s dilemma between control and educative methods in inspections. This dilemma is “classic” in state regulation. It rests upon two different principles for state activity: the legality and the service principles. Reflecting on it is necessary when developing tactics in a given situation. In this article I elaborate on the general logical and practical consequences that, first and foremost, the RSR-strategy has, or rather should have, on inspectors’ work and the alternative roles that comprise the dilemma. My main conclusions are that the dilemma in state inspection is permanent and can only be handled on a situational basis. However, because of the growing complexity and differentiation in working life, and because of the change of strategy and new tasks for the inspectorate, both the content of, and the balance between, the roles of the dilemma have to change. All in all this change calls for a stronger emphasis on the role of educator. At the same time the role-content has to change from traditional methods of direct control and advice/persuasion to negotiation, guiding and tutoring. However, to work with inspections in the OHS field today is to work with mixed strategies. Even if RSR is stated as the main strategy, the traditional command and control strategy still lives side-by-side with it in legislation. Methods based on this rationale sometimes have to be given priority. All in all, the fulfilment of the new tasks demands the development of professional competence and a higher degree of discretion for individual inspectors. To an even greater extent than before they have to be flexible in unique situations and develop proper tactics adjusted to local conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 4, no 2, p. 3-23
Keyword [en]
Work environment, occupational health and safety management, regulation, regulated self-regulation, command and control regulation, systematic OHSM, labour inspectorate, inspector’s dilemma, prevention, compliance.
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-4683OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-4683DiVA, id: diva2:138982
Available from: 2008-11-07 Created: 2008-11-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Bruhn, Anders

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • asciidoc
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