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Match activities of elite women soccer players at different performance levels
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We sought to study the physical demands and match performance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players changed locomotor activity >1,300 times in a game corresponding to every ~4 seconds and covered 9-11 km in total. The top-class players ran 28% longer (P < 0.05) at high intensities than high-level players (1.68 +/- 0.09 and 1.33 +/- 0.10 km, respectively) and sprinted 24% longer (P < 0.05). The top-class group had a decrease (P < 0.05) of 25-57% in high intensity running in the final 15 minutes compared with the first four 15-minutes intervals, whereas the high-level group performed less (P < 0.05) high-intensity running in the last 15 minutes of each half in comparison with the 2 previous 15-minute periods in the respective half. Peak distance covered by high intensity running in a 5-minute interval was 33% longer (P < 0.05) for the top-class players than the high-level players. In the following 5 minutes immediately after the peak interval top-class players covered 17% less (P < 0.05) high-intensity running than the game average. Defenders performed fewer (P < 0.05) intervals of high-intensity running than midfielders and attackers, as well as fewer (P < 0.05) sprints than the attackers. In conclusion, for women soccer players (1) top-class international players perform more intervals of high-intensity running than elite players at a lower level, (2) fatigue develops temporarily during and towards the end of a game, and (3) defenders have lower work rates than midfielders and attackers. The difference in high-intensity running between the 2 levels demonstrates the importance of intense intermittent exercise for match performance in women soccer. Thus, these aspects should be trained intensively in women soccer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer , 2008. Vol. 22, no 2, p. 341-349
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sport Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5026DOI: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318165fef6PubMedID: 18550946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-5026DiVA, id: diva2:139340
Available from: 2009-01-21 Created: 2009-01-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, Helena M

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