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Accumulation, metabolism, and food-chain transfer of chlorinated and brominated contaminants in subadult white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhals (Monodon monoceros) from Svalbard, Norway
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2006 (English)In: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, ISSN 0090-4341, E-ISSN 1432-0703, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were studied in white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and narwhals (Monodon monoceros) from Svalbard, Norway. In addition, their main food items were included in the study. In the whales, a broad range of pollutants was found in relatively high concentrations. PCBs and pesticides were approximately 3000 and 8000 ng/g lipid, respectively, for white whales and three times higher for narwhals. PBDEs 47 were approximately 70 ng/g lipid for white whales and 170 ng/g lipid for narwhals. Compared with other marine mammals from the same area, contaminant levels are among the highest levels ever measured. These high levels are likely in part because of a decreased capacity to metabolize contaminants. Metabolic indices indicated that most compounds accumulate to the same degree in white whales and narwhals, but for some toxaphenes and chlordanes, narwhals might have a decreased metabolism and consequently a higher accumulation. The three-times-higher contaminant levels in blubber of narwhals was further explained by substantially higher contaminant levels in their more benthic diet. The high levels and broad pattern of accumulating pollutants make white whales and narwhals excellent indicators for a wide range of contaminants in the Arctic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 50, no 1, p. 69-78
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Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Environmental Chemistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5320DOI: 10.1007/s00244-004-0257-zPubMedID: 16237494OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-5320DiVA, id: diva2:158689
Available from: 2009-02-03 Created: 2009-02-03 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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van Bavel, Bert

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