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Distribution of brominated flame retardants in different dust fractions in air from an electronics recycling facility
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7338-2079
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (MTM)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6217-8857
2005 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 350, no 1-3, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Twelve air samples were collected from an electronic recycling facility in Sweden representing three different dust fractions; respirable, total and inhalable dust. Four samples were collected from each fraction. The highest concentration of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) #209 (ten bromine atoms) was found in the samples from the inhalable dust fraction (ID), which was 10 times higher than for the "total dust" fraction (TD). The concentration ranges were 157.6-208.6; 13.9-16.7; and 2.8-3.3 ng/m3 for inhalable, total and respirable fractions, respectively. The second most abundant PBDE congener was PBDE #183 (seven bromine atoms), followed by the second most abundant substance 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) in all samples. In addition, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DeBDethane) was tentatively identified in five of the samples. Because of the large differences in air concentrations between the three fractions in ID, TD and RD, it is suggested that the inhalable instead of "total dust" fraction should be used to assess air concentrations, in particular for the larger and higher brominated flame retardants (BFRs).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 350, no 1-3, p. 151-160
National Category
Natural Sciences Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5321DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2005.01.015PubMedID: 15885753OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-5321DiVA, id: diva2:158690
Available from: 2009-02-03 Created: 2009-02-03 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved

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Julander, AnneliEngwall, Magnusvan Bavel, Bert

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