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Tactile stimulation associated with nursing care to individuals with dementia showing aggressive or restless tendencies: an intervention study in dementia care
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. (Vårdvetenskap)
Bodö University College, Norge.
Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscenter, Örebro läns landsting.
2007 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, Vol. 2, 1-9 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim.  This study aimed to describe from documentation both the caregivers' experiences of giving tactile stimulation to five people with moderate-to-severe dementia and who showed aggressive or restless tendencies, and the changes seen in them. Background.  Clinical experiences indicate that tactile stimulation can contribute to a feeling of trust and confirmation as well as to improving communication, promoting relaxation and easing pain. There is, however, very little scientific documentation of the effects of touch massage for people with dementia. Design.  From caregivers' documentation (28 weeks) of experiences, the giving of tactile stimulation to five randomly selected people with dementia showing aggressive or restless tendencies and the subsequent changes noticed. Method.  The documentation was analysed by using qualitative content analysis. Results.  All residents displayed signs of positive feelings and relaxation. The caregivers stated that they felt able to interact with the residents in a more positive way and that they felt they had a warmer relationship with them. Conclusion.  Tactile stimulation can be seen as a valuable way to communicating non-verbally, of giving feedback, confirmation, consolation or a feeling of being valuable and taken care of. Relevance to clinical practice.  Tactile stimulation has to be administered with respect and care, and given from a relational ethics perspective. Otherwise, there is a risk that tactile stimulation will be used merely as a technique instead of as a part of an effort to achieve optimal good, warm nursing care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell Publishing , 2007. Vol. 2, 1-9 p.
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
vårdvetenskap
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-5653DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-3743.2007.00056.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-5653DiVA: diva2:173781
Available from: 2009-02-17 Created: 2009-02-17 Last updated: 2010-09-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf