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Body mass index (BMI), perceptions of portion size, and knowledge of energy intake and expenditure: a pilot study
Centre for Foodservice research,Bournemouth University,England.
Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan - Grythytte Akademi, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. (Måltidskunskap)
Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. (Måltidskunskap)
2008 (English)In: Journal of Culinary Science & Technology, ISSN 1542-8052, Vol. 6, no 2-3, 151-169 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rates of overweight and obesity are increasing and although the causes are multifaceted, portion size has been implicated in a number of studies. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate perceptions of portion size, knowledge of energy requirements, and how these vary by Body Mass Index (BMI) and gender. Subjects (n = 216) were asked, using a 7-point scale, to rate the adequacy of a standard portion of both food and drink; select their preferred size from a choice of four different portions; asked questions related to energy intake and expenditure; and then weighed and heights measured. Results show that when presented with a choice, individuals generally prefer larger portions of food; the correlation between BMI and perceptions of portion sizes was significant; those with higher BMIs preferring larger portions; males preferring larger portions than females. In general, individuals have a poor understanding of their energy requirements and expenditure although there were no significant differences between BMI groups. Nearly half (43%) overestimated the amount of energy in a portion and most (54%) underestimated the amount of time required to burn that energy off. If the current overweight and obesity epidemic is to be addressed, action is required on a number of frontsone being portion size where further research is warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Haworth Press , 2008. Vol. 6, no 2-3, 151-169 p.
Keyword [en]
Portion size, overweight, obesity, energy intake, body mass index (BMI)
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6140DOI: 10.1080/15428050802338928OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-6140DiVA: diva2:209866
Available from: 2009-03-27 Created: 2009-03-27 Last updated: 2016-10-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf