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Binge eating in surgical weight-loss treatments: Long-term associations with weight loss, health related quality of life (HRQL), and psychopathology
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
2009 (English)In: Eating Behaviors, ISSN 1471-0153, Vol. 7, no 1, 15-26 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Previous studies that have investigated the relationshipbetween binge eating and the long-term outcome of bariatric surgeryhave shown mixed results. Does binge eating before or after bariatricsurgery affect long-term BMI, health-related quality of life (HRQL), orpsychopathology after surgery? The objective of the present studywas to address these questions to determine the extent to whichbinge eating needs to be addressed in the context of bariatric surgeryMethods. We assessed 173 bariatric patients before and three yearsafter weight loss surgery with regard to weight, binge eating, HRQL,and psychopathology.Results. Binge eating habits before and after weight loss surgerywere unrelated to the long-term BMI outcome. Binge eating afterweight loss surgery was associated with more psychopathology and alower HRQL.Conclusion. Binge eating before or after weight loss surgery doesnot predict long-term BMI outcome. Therefore, exclusions fromsurgery for this reason alone are difficult to motivate. However,results show that binge eating after weight loss surgery is commonand is associated with both more psychopathology and a lower HRQL.The poor psychological health status of patients that binge eat afterweight loss surgery motivates studies with longer follow-up periods toinvestigate whether post-surgical binge eating might increase thevulnerability to future weight regain and complications at time pointsbeyond three years. The high rate of binge eating after surgery andits negative association with the HRQL and psychopathology indicatethat we need to be observant of the occurrence and potential effectsof binge eating in the context of bariatric surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 7, no 1, 15-26 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6439OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-6439DiVA: diva2:213812
Available from: 2009-04-29 Created: 2009-04-29 Last updated: 2011-05-02Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Binge eating and obesity treatment: prevalence, measurement and long-term outcome
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Binge eating and obesity treatment: prevalence, measurement and long-term outcome
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Eating disorders and binge eating has repeatedly been shown to be common in surgical and behavioural weight loss treatments. Due to methodological variations and shortcomings in previous research, there is insufficient information about how eating disorders and binge eating are associated with outcome in weight loss treatments. There is therefore no consensus on how eating pathology should be adressed in weight loss treatments, which has led to large differences in the clinical practice. The main aim of this thesis was to address the issues of eating disorders and binge eating in weight loss treatments, and to investigate how binge eating is associated with long-term treatment outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2009. 68 p.
Series
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 29
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6627 (URN)978-7668-91-663-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-05-29, Wilandersalen, Örebro universitetssjukhus, Örebro, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-05 Last updated: 2011-05-02Bibliographically approved

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