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Incorporating interdependence into developmental research: examples from the study of homophily and homogeneity
Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University.
Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)
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2008 (English)In: Modeling dyadic and interdependent data in the developmental and behavioral sciences / [ed] Noel A. Card, James P. Selig, Todd Little, New York: Routledge , 2008, p. 11-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

(From the chapter) Our chapter is divided into three sections. The first section includes an overview of developmental approaches to interdependent data. The limitations of previous analytic strategies will be considered, followed by a discussion of procedures that address these limitations. Although these points apply to research on all close relationships, we will limit our examples to research on peers. Our particular focus is peer similarity, which encompasses selection and socialization influences. The second section describes a novel adaptation of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000; Kenny & Cook, 1999) to longitudinal data on friendship homophily. Conventional APIM procedures are well suited to describe concurrent patterns of association; our modified structural equation modeling approach utilizes multiple group analyses with indistinguishable dyads to shed light on socialization and selection effects across time. The third section describes a new statistical application designed to estimate peer group homogeneity from longitudinal data. The SIENA statistical software package (Snijders, Pattison, Robins, & Handcock, 2006) simultaneously models selection and socialization effects over time. We describe how to partition variance into parameters that ascribe similarity to networks, dyads, and individuals. We close with a call for developmental scholars to take seriously the need to incorporate interdependence into the design of new research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge , 2008. p. 11-37
Keywords [en]
Experimentation, Human Development, Models, Statistical Analysis, Statistical Data, Dyads, Friendship, Longitudinal Studies, Peer Relations, Socialization, Structural Equation Modeling
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6522ISBN: 978-0-8058-5973-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-6522DiVA, id: diva2:214179
Available from: 2009-05-04 Created: 2009-05-04 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Burk, William J.Kerr, MargaretStattin, Håkan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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