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Affective responses to qigong exercise: a pilot study
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. (RISPA)
Stockholms universitet.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Physical exercise is frequently associated with positive affective responses – at least more intense exercise; the impact of low-intensity exercise is less researched. The exercise-affect relationship was therefore studied in a group performing low-intensity Qigong exercise through pre-, during, and post-assessments using a modified version of the short Swedish Core Affect Scale complemented with open-ended questions. The results show a shift during exercise toward increased pleasant activated and deactivated affect in the group of 46 women who regularly practice Qigong. Inter-individual responses display positive affective responses, which also increase as the bout proceeds for the majority of exercisers. The results suggest that low-intensity Qigong exercise also produces positive psychological effects of a magnitude similar to what is commonly associated with more intense forms of exercise. These findings have practical implications for the enhancement of positive affect and subjective well-being, not least in groups unable to perform more intense forms of exercise. 2

National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6663OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-6663DiVA, id: diva2:216316
Available from: 2009-05-07 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Qigong: acute affective responses in a group of regular exercisers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qigong: acute affective responses in a group of regular exercisers
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Qigong is a Chinese mind-body therapy that aims to, through the use of movements, relaxed breathing and relaxation/meditation, create a healthy flow of life force, qi, in the body, and consequently improve health. A growing number of Qigong studies report beneficial effects on health and well-being. However, little attention has fo-cused on the acute affective responses that accompany single sessions of Qigong ex-ercise. The aim of the present thesis was therefore to study affective reactions to Qigong exercise. In Study I, the effects of Qigong exercise on mood and anxiety were compared to a control group. Results showed partial support for the superiority of Qigong exercise compared to controls. In Study II, different lengths of session time were compared, resulting in similar affective benefits for the 30 and 60-minute ses-sions. In Study III, affective responses were also assessed during the session, using mean scores and individual responses. Results showed an increase toward greater Activated and Deactivated Pleasantness during the session, with the greatest changes at the end of the bout. The majority of individuals reported increased Pleasantness during the Qigong session. Expectations of positive outcomes were significantly as-sociated with only few affective responses. Responses to open-ended questions of af-fective experiences displayed affective reactions mostly toward greater Deactivated Pleasantness. This thesis contributes to a greater understanding of the limited area of Qigong-related affective responses. For the exercisers, Qigong is associated with a greater momentary emotional state. However, due to the highly select group of regu-lar Qigong exercisers, generalizing the results outside the sample population is lim-ited. Theories on active mechanisms in the Qigong-affect relationship, and results from studies of affective responses to similar activities, suggest that other groups of people would also benefit affectively from Qigong exercise. Given the many benefits of positive affect, Qigong exercise may also pose great promises for the enhancement of other areas related to health and well-being. This calls for additional studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2009. p. 129
Series
Örebro Studies in Sport Sciences, ISSN 1654-7535 ; 4
Keyword
qigong, affective responses, mind-body therapy, low-intensive physical activity, affect regulation
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-6664 (URN)978-91-7668-665-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-05-29, HSG, Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin, 701 82 Örebro, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-06-17 Created: 2009-05-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, MattiasHertting, Anna

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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