oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Postoperative recovery: a concept analysis
Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital ,Örebro,Sweden.
Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Research Section, Kalmar County Council, Kalmar,Sweden; Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro,Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital , Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5403-4183
2007 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 5, 552-558 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. This papaer presents a concept analysis of the phenomeneon postoperative recovery.

Background. Each year, millions of patients throughout the world undergo surgical procedures. Although postoperative recovery is commonly used as an outcome of surgery, it is difficult to identify a standard definition.

Method. Walker and Avant´s concept analysis approach was used. Literature retrieved from MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for english language papers published from 1982 to 2005 was used for the analysis.

Findings. The theoretical definition developed points out that postoperative recovery is an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness. It is defined by comparative standards, achieved by regaining control over physical, psychological, social and habitual functions, and results in a return to preoperative level of independence/dependence in activities of daily living and optimum level of psychological well-being.

Conclusion. The concept of postoperative recovery lacks clarity, both in its meaning in relation to postoperative recovery to healthcare professionals in their care for surgical patients, and in the understanding of what researchers in this area really intend to investigate. The theoretical definition we have developed may be useful but needs to be further explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell , 2007. Vol. 57, no 5, 552-558 p.
Keyword [en]
concept analysis, definition, postoperative, recovery
National Category
Surgery Nursing
Research subject
Surgery; Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8079DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2006.04156.xISI: 000244244000010PubMedID: 17284272Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33846991897OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-8079DiVA: diva2:241628
Available from: 2009-10-05 Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2016-08-10Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Postoperative recovery: development of a multi-dimensional questionnaire for assessment of Recovery
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative recovery: development of a multi-dimensional questionnaire for assessment of Recovery
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis aims to present a multi-dimensional instrument for self-assessment of progress in postoperative recovery. The author employs different research paradigms and methodologies to achieve this aim.

Walker and Avant’s approach to concept analysis was used to examine the basic elements of postoperative recovery (Study I). The analysis identified different recovery dimensions and developed a theoretical definition showing postoperative recovery to be an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness, defined by comparative standards.

Fourteen patients and 28 staff members participated in individual and focus group interviews aimed at describing patient and staff experiences of patient recovery (Study II). The essence of the postoperative recovery process was described as a desire to decrease unpleasant physical symptoms, reach a level of emotional wellbeing, regain functions, and re-establish activities.

In Study III, 5 dimensions and 19 items were identified as a part of the operationalization process of the concept postoperative recovery. Fifteen staff members and 16 patients participated in the evaluation of content validity. On average, 85% of the participants considered the items as essential to the recovery process. In a test run of the questionnaire, 14 of 15 patients considered the questionnaire to be easy to understand and easy to complete. Twenty-five patients participated in the evaluation of intra-patient reliability. Percentage agreement (PA), systematic disagreement (RP, RC), and individual variability (RV) between the two assessments were calculated. PA measures ranged from 72% to 100%. The observed disagreement could be explained mainly by systematic disagreement.

In total, 158 patients participated in the evaluation of construct validity, the ability to discriminate between groups, and the investigation of important item variables (Study IV). A rank-based statistical method for evaluation of paired, ordered categorical data from rating scales was used to evaluate consistency between the assessments of the Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire and a global recovery scale. The number of months needed by participants to be regarded as fully recovered was studied by means of recovery profiles displayed by the cumulative proportion of recovered participants over time. A ranking list based on the participant’s appraisal of the five most important item variables in the PRP questionnaire was compiled to illustrate the rank ordering of the items. In comparing the assessments from the PRP questionnaire and the global recovery scale, 7.6% of all possible pairs were disordered. Twelve months after discharge 73% in the orthopaedic group were regarded as fully recovered, compared to 51% of the participants in the abdominal group (95% CI: 6% to 40%). The pain variable appeared among the top five most important items on eight measurement occasions, of eight possible, in both study groups.

In conclusion, the PRP questionnaire was developed and support was given for validity and reliability. The questionnaire enables one to evaluate progress in postoperative recovery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2009. 73 p.
Series
Örebro Studies in Medicine, ISSN 1652-4063 ; 32
Keyword
Concept analysis, experiences, postoperative recovery, questionnaire, recovery profile, reliability, validity
National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7731 (URN)978-91-7668-678-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-09-25, Wilandersalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-08-25 Created: 2009-08-25 Last updated: 2011-05-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Allvin, RenéeNilsson, Ulrica
By organisation
Department of Clinical MedicineDepartment of Nursing and Caring Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Advanced Nursing
SurgeryNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 872 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf