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Nurse involvement in end-of-life decision making: the ETHICUS Study
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2006 (English)In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to investigate physicians' perceptions of the role of European intensive care nurses in end-of-life decision making. DESIGN: This study was part of a larger study sponsored by the Ethics Section of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the ETHICUS Study. Physicians described whether they thought nurses were involved in such decisions, whether nurses initiated such a discussion and whether there was agreement between physicians and nurses. The items were analyzed and comparisons were made between different regions within Europe. SETTING: The study took place in 37 intensive care units in 17 European countries. PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS: Physician investigators reported data related to patients from 37 centers in 17 European countries. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Physicians perceived nurses as involved in 2,412 (78.3%) of the 3,086 end-of-life decisions (EOLD) made. Nurses were thought to initiate the discussion in 66 cases (2.1%), while ICU physicians were cited in 2,438 cases (79.3%), the primary physician in 328 cases (10.7%), the consulting physician in 105 cases (3.4%), the family in 119 cases (3.9%) and the patient in 19 cases (0.6%). In only 20 responses (0.6%) did physicians report disagreement between physicians and nurses related to EOLD. A significant association was found between the region and responses to the items related to nursing. Physicians in more northern regions reported more nurse involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians perceive nurses as involved to a large extent in EOLDs, but not as initiating the discussion. Once a decision is made, there is a sense of agreement. The level of perceived participation is different for different regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 32, no 1, p. 129-132
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11105DOI: 10.1007/s00134-005-2864-1PubMedID: 16292624OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-11105DiVA: diva2:324927
Available from: 2010-06-16 Created: 2010-06-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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