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The role of standardised nursing languages in representing nursing and supporting nurses as knowledge workers
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2010. , p. 89
Series
Örebro Studies in Care Sciences, ISSN 1652-1153 ; 28
National Category
Nursing Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11268ISBN: 978-91-7668-744-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-11268DiVA, id: diva2:327246
Public defence
2010-10-11, Hörsal P2, Fakultetsgatan, Örebro universitet, 701 82 Örebro, 13:15
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-06-28 Created: 2010-06-28 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing
2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 128-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p < 0.01) by all nursing specialities except one, Crisis Management. A Tukey post hoc test showed how nursing specialities were reflected differently in the NIC domains, e.g. medical/surgical nursing in the Physiological: Basic Domain, but psychiatric nursing in the Behavioural Domain. Factor analysis of classes in NIC show good resemblance with the domains in NIC and the structure of the classification is strongly supported, except the Safety Domain. The results from this study indicate that nurses in the sample consider NIC to be applicable to describe nursing. The language is a powerful tool and is central in reflecting nursing practice as well as supporting the construct of knowledge. The translation of NIC to Icelandic is one step in many in preparing nurses to use a standardized language which can also be used in an electronic patient record.

Keywords
nursing interventions, nursing intervetions classification, standardized
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12328 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2005.00332.x (DOI)
Note
The correct name is: Ásta ThoroddsenAvailable from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
2. Putting policy into practice: pre- and posttests of implementing standardized languages for nursing documentation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting policy into practice: pre- and posttests of implementing standardized languages for nursing documentation
2007 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 1826-1838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the change in documentation of the nursing process in all inpatient wards in a 900-bed university hospital. Major research question was what are the differences between before and after implementation of documentation policy related to the steps of the nursing process?

BACKGROUND: Implementation of standardized languages has been shown to be difficult to accomplish in clinical practice. Patients are the source of data and their conditions, responses and well-being should be reflected in the nursing record. As such, nursing documentation can create the premises for the development of new knowledge in nursing and the improvement of nursing performance and can provide data and information necessary for nursing researchers to evaluate the quality of interventions and participate in the formulation of healthcare policy. This study is part of longitudinal project to prepare nurses for electronic documentation within the interdisciplinary health record and to improve documentation of nursing using standardized languages.

DESIGN AND METHOD: A cross-sectional study design was used: a pretest (n = 355 nursing records) for baseline status of nursing documentation, an intervention and a post-test (n = 349 nursing records) to obtain data on nursing documentation. The year-long intervention comprised planned work in groups, and educational and supporting efforts.

RESULTS: A statistically significant improvement was found in the use of Functional Health Patterns for documentation of nursing assessment, NANDA for nursing diagnoses and Nursing Interventions Classification for nursing interventions in documentation of daily nursing care for inpatients.

CONCLUSION: At all organizational levels intervention aimed at putting policy regarding documentation into clinical practice considerably improved daily use of standardized nursing languages. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses need to use standardized language to document patient care data in the electronic health record and to demonstrate contributions to nursing care.

Keywords
nursing assessment, nursing diagnoses, nursing documentation, nursing interventions, nursing outcomes, nursing process
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12329 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2007.01836.x (DOI)
Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
3. Nursing specialty knowledge as expressed by standardized nursing languages
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing specialty knowledge as expressed by standardized nursing languages
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications, ISSN 1541-5147, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 69-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe how nursing specialty knowledge is demonstrated in nursing records by use of standardized nursing languages.

Methods: A cross-sectional review of nursing records (N = 265) in four specialties.

Findings: The most common nursing diagnoses represented basic human needs of patients across specialties. The nursing diagnoses and related interventions represented specific knowledge in each specialty. Sixty-three nursing diagnoses (nine appeared in four specialties) and 168 nursing interventions were used (24 appeared in four specialties).

Conclusions: Findings suggest that standardized nursing languages are capable of distinguishing between specialties. Further studies with large data sets are needed to explore the relationships between nursing diagnoses and nursing interventions in order to make explicit the knowledge that nurses use in their nursing practice.

Practice implications: Nursing data in clinical practice must be stored and retrievable to support clinical decision making, advance nursing knowledge, and the unique perspective of nursing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
Keywords
Nursing diagnosis, nursing interventions, standardized nursing language, nursing knowledge, record audit
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12330 (URN)10.1111/j.1744-618X.2010.01148.x (DOI)000208327100004 ()20500613 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77955912483 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2018-04-19Bibliographically approved
4. Content and completeness of care plans after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content and completeness of care plans after implementation of standardized nursing terminologies
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12332 (URN)
Available from: 2010-10-26 Created: 2010-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved

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