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Parents' possibility to prevent underage drinking: studies of parents, a parental support program, and adolescents in the context of a national program to support NGOs
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6633-1636
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Underage drinking is common among Swedish adolescents and is related to problems for individuals, families, and society. From a public health perspective, it is of great importance that knowledge be gained about alcohol prevention. The overall aim of this thesis is, within the context of a national support program for NGOs, to study parents, a parental support program, and adolescents with regard to preventing underage drinking.  The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare (NBHW) has a government commission to distribute funds to non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for alcohol and drug prevention efforts. Study I of the thesis describes and analyses this program with a special emphasis on research and development for an evidence-based practice. It is a research strategy case study with 135 projects and 14 embedded in-depth studies. The results reveal that this program to support NGOs has been successful in engaging a wide range of NGOs in prevention efforts. A trustful partnership between practitioners, national agencies, and researchers has also been developed, which has improved the quality and results of the different projects. Studies II, III, IV, and V all used data from a longitudinal questionnaire study with parents and adolescents within one of the 14 in-depth studies: the study of IOGT-NTO’s parental program Strong and Clear. Additional data, such as telephone interviews and other parental questionnaires, are also used.  Study II aims to analyse the significance of socio-demographic factors for parental attitudes and behaviour regarding adolescent alcohol consumption to see if any group of parents is especially important for intervention efforts. The results showed that fathers were more likely than mothers to have non-restrictive attitudes towards underage drinking and to have children who had drunk or tasted alcohol at home. Study III examines reasons for non-participation in the program. Parents with a low educational level were found more likely to be non-participants than highly educated parents. When parents stated their reasons for non-participation it emerged that they did not perceive a need for the intervention and that there were practical obstacles to their participation. Study IV is an effect study of Strong and Clear and showed that the program contributed to maintaining parents’ restrictive attitude toward underage drinking, postponing alcohol debut, and preventing drunkenness among the adolescents. Study V, only presented in the thesis, examined parents’ perceptions about Strong and Clear. Parents primarily thought it had led to their speaking more often about alcohol with their children, and had been a help in this conversation. Many also stated that the program had influenced their ability to set limits for their children. The school and IOGT-NTO were considered as suitable providers of Strong and Clear. This thesis showed that a national support program for NGOs including research and development contributes to a more evidence-based public health practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2010. , p. 136
Series
Örebro Studies in Care Sciences, ISSN 1652-1153 ; 29
Keyword [en]
Non-governmental organizations, alcohol, adolescents, underage drinking, prevention, parents, parental support
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11294ISBN: 978-91-7668-748-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-11294DiVA, id: diva2:327773
Public defence
2010-10-01, Hörsal G, Gymnastikhuset, Fakultetsgatan, Örebro universitet, 701 82 Örebro, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-06-30 Created: 2010-06-30 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden 2003–2009 – A Study of National Board of Health and Welfare Grants to Research and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden 2003–2009 – A Study of National Board of Health and Welfare Grants to Research and Development
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11626 (URN)
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
2. Parental attitudes and behaviour concerning adolescent alcohol consumption: do sociodemographic factors matter?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental attitudes and behaviour concerning adolescent alcohol consumption: do sociodemographic factors matter?
2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 509-517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Parental attitudes and behaviour with regard to young people and alcohol are associated with teenagers' drinking behaviour. This study examined the association between sociodemographic factors among parents and parental attitudes and behaviour with regard to alcohol and adolescents. Methods: Postal questionnaires were sent to parents of children aged 12—16 years in six Swedish municipalities. Seven hundred and ninety-five parents were included in the study. Seven sociodemographic factors and four questions identifying parental attitudes and behaviour were examined. Logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios and confidence intervals. Results: The study showed that fathers were more likely than mothers to report that children had been drinking or tasting alcohol at home. Parents who answered the questionnaire together also stated that their children had been served alcohol at home to a larger extent than mothers. Fathers, single parents and parents with older children were more likely to have non-restrictive attitudes towards adolescents and alcohol than mothers, parents living in a household with more than one adult, and parents with younger children. Factors such as age of the parents, employment status and numbers of children in the household were not associated with either parental attitudes or behaviour. Conclusions: The sex of the responding parent was the only sociodemographic factor that was associated with both parental attitudes and behaviour. Fathers were more likely than mothers to have a non-restrictive attitude. The fathers also reported to a greater extent than mothers that children had been drinking or tasting alcohol at home.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Taylor & Francis, 2009
Keyword
Adolescents, alcohol, attitude, parent, sociodemographic
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11627 (URN)10.1177/1403494809105790 (DOI)000267558100010 ()
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
3. Reasons for non-participation in a parental program concerning underage drinking: a mixed-method study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reasons for non-participation in a parental program concerning underage drinking: a mixed-method study
2009 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, article id 478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Alcohol consumption among adolescents is a serious public health concern. Research has shown that prevention programs targeting parents can help prevent underage drinking. The problem is that parental participation in these kinds of interventions is generally low. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine non-participation in a parental support program aiming to prevent underage alcohol drinking. The Health Belief Model has been used as a tool for the analysis.

Methods: To understand non-participation in a parental program a quasi-experimental mixed-method design was used. The participants in the study were invited to participate in a parental program targeting parents with children in school years 7-9. A questionnaire was sent home to the parents before the program started. Two follow-up surveys were also carried out. The inclusion criteria for the study were that the parents had answered the questionnaire in school year 7 and either of the questionnaires in the two subsequent school years (n = 455). Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine reasons for non-participation. The final follow-up questionnaire included an opened-ended question about reasons for non-participation. A qualitative content analysis was carried out and the two largest categories were included in the third model of the multinomial logistic regression analysis.

Results: Educational level was the most important socio-demographic factor for predicting non-participation. Parents with a lower level of education were less likely to participate than those who were more educated. Factors associated with adolescents and alcohol did not seem to be of significant importance. Instead, program-related factors predicted non-participation, e.g. parents who did not perceive any need for the intervention and who did not attend the information meeting were more likely to be non-participants. Practical issues, like time demands, also seemed to be important.

Conclusion: To design a parental program that attracts parents independently of educational level seems to be an important challenge for the future as well as program marketing. This is something that must be considered when implementing prevention programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2009
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11628 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-9-478 (DOI)000273848400001 ()20025743 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-76849115776 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
4. Effects of a parental program for preventing underage drinking: the NGO program Strong and Clear
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a parental program for preventing underage drinking: the NGO program Strong and Clear
2011 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, article id 251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The present study is an evaluation of a 3-year parental program aiming to prevent underage drinking. The intervention was implemented by a non-governmental organization and targeted parents with children aged 13-16 years old and included recurrent activities during the entire period of secondary school. The program consisted of four different types of group and self-administered activities: parent meetings, family dialogues, friend meetings, and family meetings.

Methods

A quasi-experimental design was used following parents and children with questionnaires during the three years of secondary school. The analytic sample consisted of 509 dyads of parents and children. Measures of parental attitudes and behaviour concerning underage drinking and adolescents' lifetime alcohol consumption and drunkenness were used. Three socio-demographic factors were included: parental education, school, and gender of the child. A Latent Growth Modelling (LGM) approach was used to examine changes in parental behaviour regarding youth drinking and in young people's drinking behaviour. To test for the pre-post test differences in parental attitudes repeated measures ANOVA were used.

Results

The results showed that parents in the program maintained their restrictive attitude toward underage drinking to a higher degree than non-participating parents. Adolescents of participants were on average one year older than adolescents with non-participating parents when they made their alcohol debut. They were also less likely to have ever been drunk in school year 9.

Conclusion

The results of the study suggested that Strong and Clear contributed to maintaining parents' restrictive attitude toward underage drinking during secondary school, postponing alcohol debut among the adolescents, and significantly reducing their drunkenness

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2011
Keyword
Adolescent, underage drinking, alcohol, parental program, prevention
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11629 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-11-251 (DOI)000291049600001 ()21510858 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79954626188 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2010-08-24 Created: 2010-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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