oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A time trend study of significantly elevated perfluorocarboxylate levels in humans after using fluorinated ski wax
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3722-4633
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 2150-2155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A time trend study focusing on ski waxing technicians' exposure to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) from fluorinated wax fumes was performed in 2007/2008. Levels of eight perfluorocarboxylates and three perfluorosulfonates were analyzed in monthly blood samples from eight technicians, Samples were collected before the ski season, i.e., preseason, then at four AS World Cup competitions in cross country skiing, and finally during an unexposed 5-month postseason period. The perfluorinated carboxylates perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) bioaccumulate, and continued exposure may contribute to elevated levels in ski technicians compared to the general population. The wax technicians' median blood level of PFOA is 112 ng/mL compared to 2.5 ng/mL in the general Swedish population. A significant correlation was found between number of working years and levels of perfluorocarboxylates. The PFOA levels in three technicians with "low" initial levels of PFOA (< 10.0 ng/mL in preseason blood) increased by 254, 134, and 120%, whereas five technicians with "high" initial levels (> 100 ng/mL in preseason sample) were at steady state. PFHxA is suggested to have a short half-life in humans relative the other perfluorocarboxylates. The levels of perfluorosulfonates were unaffected by the wax exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, USA: American Chemical Society (ACS), 2010. Vol. 44, no 6, p. 2150-2155
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry; Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12995DOI: 10.1021/es9034733ISI: 000275325600044PubMedID: 20158198Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77949394533OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-12995DiVA: diva2:382876
Available from: 2011-01-03 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Occupational exposure to fluorinated ski wax
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational exposure to fluorinated ski wax
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) are used in the production of ski wax to reduce the friction between the snow and the ski. In this occupational study of ski wax technicians’ exposure to PFAS and particulate aerosol we have collected whole blood (wb) (n =94), air (n =84) and aerosol (n =159) samples at World Cup events from 2007-2011.

We have analysed the blood, air and aerosol with respect to 13 perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), 4 perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs), 3 fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), 3 fluorotelomer acids (FTCAs) and 3 unsaturated fluorotelomer acids (FTUCAs). Further, we assessed the exposure to 3 particulate aerosol fractions (inhalable, respirable and total aerosol) in air.

In comparison to a general population, several of the PFCA blood levels are elevated in the technicians’, primarily  erfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorononate (PFNA) with concentrations up to 628 and 163 ng/mL wb, respectively. Further,  we detected FTUCAs and FTCAs in the blood, suggesting biotransformation of FTOHs to PFCAs. The metabolites 5:3 and 7:3 FTCA were detected in all blood samples at levels up to 6.1 and 3.9 ng/mL wb. Levels of perfluorohexadecanoic acid PFHxDA) and perfluorooctadecanoic acid (PFOcDA) were detected in the technician’s blood at mean concentration up to 4.22 ng/mL wb and 4.25 ng/mL wb.

The FTOH levels in air of the wax cabin during work ranged up to 997 000 ng/m3 (average=114 000 ng/m3 ) and PFOA up to 4 890 ng/m3 (average= 526 ng/m3 . FTOHs were not detected in aerosols but PFOA showed average levels of 12 000 ng/m3 (range=1 230- 46 900 ng/m3 ).

The occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 2 mg/m3 was exceeded in 37% of the personal measurements with aerosol  concentrations up to 15 mg/m3 . Keywords : Perfluorinated, polyfluorinated, FIS, occupational exposure, ski wax,  iotransformation, metabolism, fluorotelomer alcohol, fluorotelomer acid, aerosol, dust, UPLC/MS-MS, GC/MS-MS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2012. p. 73
Series
Örebro Studies in Chemistry, ISSN 1651-4270 ; 11
Keyword
Perfluorinated, polyfluorinated, FIS, occupational exposure, ski wax, biotransformation, metabolism, fluorotelomer alcohol, fluorotelomer acid, aerosol, dust, UPLC/MS-MS, GC/MS-MS
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24289 (URN)978-91-7668-887-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-09-28, Hörsal P2, Prismahuset, Örebro universitet, Falultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Available from: 2012-08-07 Created: 2012-08-07 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Nilsson, HelenaKärrman, AnnaWestberg, HåkanRotander, Annavan Bavel, BertLindström, Gunilla

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, HelenaKärrman, AnnaWestberg, HåkanRotander, Annavan Bavel, BertLindström, Gunilla
By organisation
School of Science and Technology
In the same journal
Environmental Science and Technology
Chemical SciencesEnvironmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 386 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf