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Levels in food and beverages and daily intake of perfluorinated compounds in Norway
Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Environm Med, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5752-4196
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6330-789X
Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Div Environm Med, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway.
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2010 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 80, no 10, p. 1137-1143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been determined in 21 samples of selected food and beverages such as meat, fish, bread, vegetables, milk, drinking water and tea from the Norwegian marked. Up to 12 different PFCs were detected in the samples. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were found in concentrations similar to or lower than what has been observed in other studies world-wide. Differences in the relative proportion of PFOA and PFOS between samples of animal origin and samples of non-animal origin were observed and support findings that PFOS has a higher bio-accumulation potential in animals than PFOA. Based on these 21 measurements and consumption data for the general Norwegian population, a rough estimate of the total dietary intake of PFCs was found to be around 100 ng d(-1). PFOA and PFOS contributed to about 50% of the total intake. When dividing the population in gender and age groups, estimated intakes were decreasing with increasing age and were higher in males than females. The estimated intakes of PFOS and PFOA in the present study are lower than what has been reported in studies from Spain, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada and Japan. This study illustrates that by improving the analytical methods for determination of PFC in food samples, a broad range of compounds can be detected, which is important when assessing dietary exposure. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 80, no 10, p. 1137-1143
Keyword [en]
PFC, Food, Dietary intake, Norway, Beverages
National Category
Chemical Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry; Environmental Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12893DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2010.06.023ISI: 000281330900005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-12893DiVA: diva2:383445
Available from: 2011-01-05 Created: 2011-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Salihovic, SamiraEricson Jogsten, Ingridvan Bavel, BertLindström, Gunilla

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