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Sediment chronologies of As, Bi, and Ga in Sweden - impact of industrialisation
Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
2007 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The acid-leachable amount and pore water concentration of As, Bi and Ga in sediment cores from four remote lakes in a south to north transect in Sweden were used to recapitulate the pollution history of the elements. The diagenetic impact on the element distribution was elucidated from their solid/solution partition and relationships to elements indicative for diagenesis. Dating was made by their acid-leachable lead content in combination with the Pb-206/Pb-207 ratio. In one of the lakes this approach was validated against dating with Pb-210. The impact of diagenesis on the sediment distribution of theses elements was found to be low enough for a chronological interpretation of the sediment profiles, as evidenced by their ratios to elements indicative of the geological background. A closer examination of the diagenetic impact would however be required if a more detailed chronology is desired. This study has demonstrated that atmospheric deposition of arsenic, bismuth and gallium contributes to the sediment inventory of these elements. The major part of the deposition of arsenic and bismuth took place after the Second World War. For gallium no concentrations exceeding background were detected before circa 1930. Increased levels of arsenic are traceable to circa 1850. For bismuth increased levels are concluded to extend before 1790, i.e., background concentrations were not reached in the present cores. For all elements the atmospheric deposition has been lower towards the north.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 42, no 2, p. 155-164
Keywords [en]
arsenic, bismuth, gallium, sediment, porewater, chronology, lakes
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-13933DOI: 10.1080/10934520601011320ISI: 000242986600007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-13933DiVA, id: diva2:389730
Available from: 2011-01-20 Created: 2011-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, StefanDüker, AndersGrahn, Evastina

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