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The behaviour of barium, strontium, aluminium, chromium and molybdenum when leaching fly ash with acid rock drainage
Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2674-4994
2008 (English)In: ICAM 2008: Ninth international congress for applied mineralogy, 2008, p. 357-364Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Acid rock drainage (ARD), commonly found in vicinities of sulfidic mines, possess properties capable of widely affecting the surrounding environment by acidification and heavy metal pollution. In most ARD treatments, various alkaline sources are used to neutralise the acid produced. Utilisation of highly alkaline fly ashes instead of raw materials is a cost-effective alternative, which lately have become increasingly popular. In laboratory batch experiments, neutralising capacity of fly ash was studied during 20 days. ARD was added to the fly ash once a day, for each increment the liquid to solid ratio (L/S ratio) was increased. At an early stage of the experiment (day 6, L/S ratio 12), the concentration of barium in solution unexpectedly increased by a factor of 50 (from 200 to 10 000 Όg·1-1). This high concentration also sustained the following two days (L/S ratios 14 and 16) before dropping to the original level. pH showed a slight increase during these observations (pH 12.4-12.7). The phenomenon was also observed in a parallel and identical series. In addition to barium, aluminium and strontium clearly increased in the same manner, however not as much as barium. Furthermore, concentrations of chromium and molybdenum noticeably decreased at these distinct L/S ratios (12, 14 and 16). The behaviour of barium and subsequently strontium, aluminium, chromium and molybdenum is only partially understood. The decrease of chromium and molybdenum is suggested to be due to incorporation into the interlayer regions of hydrocalumite (Ca4Al2(OH)12(OH) 2·6H2O), replacing the hydroxide groups, which also explains the increase in pH. Moreover, the increase of barium, strontium and aluminium could be attributable to dissolution of the silicate mineral celsian (Ba,Sr(Al2Si2O8)). Alternatively, barium and strontium increase could be explained by dissolution of a Ba,Sr(SO 4)-solid solution and aluminium increase by dissolution of hydrocalumite or ettringite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. p. 357-364
Series
Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Publication Series
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-14396ISBN: 978-1-920806-86-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-14396DiVA: diva2:393610
Conference
9th International Congress for Applied Mineralogy, ICAM 2008; Brisbane, QLD; 8 September 2008 through 10 September 2008
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Bäckström, Mattias

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