oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Four aspects of self-image close to death at home
Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sko¨ndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden..
Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sko¨ndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden. Research and Development Unit, Stockholm Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3702-3831
Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 2, article id 5931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Living close to death means an inevitable confrontation with one’s own existential limitation. In this article, we argue that everyday life close to death embodies an identity work in progress. We used a narrative approach and a holistic-content reading to analyze 12 interviews conducted with three persons close to death. By illuminating the unique stories and identifying patterns among the participants’ narratives, we found four themes exemplifying important aspects of the identity work related to everyday life close to death. Two of the themes, named ‘‘Inside and outside of me’’ and ‘‘Searching for togetherness,’’ represented the core of the self-image and were framed by the other themes, ‘‘My place in space’’ and ‘‘My death and my time.’’ Our findings elucidate the way the individual stories moved between the past, the present, and the future. This study challenges the idea that everyday life close to impending death primarily means limitations. The findings show that the search for meaning, new knowledge, and community can form a part of a conscious and ongoing identity work close to death.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CoAction Publishing, 2011. Vol. 6, no 2, article id 5931
Keyword [en]
Death and dying, identity, narrative research, palliative care, qualitative inquiry, self-image
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15396DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v6i2.5931ISI: 000290795000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84874984106OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-15396DiVA, id: diva2:413174
Available from: 2011-04-27 Created: 2011-04-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Ternestedt, Britt-MarieSahlberg-Blom, Eva

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ternestedt, Britt-MarieSahlberg-Blom, Eva
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences
In the same journal
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being
Medical and Health SciencesNursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 342 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf