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Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration in a Norway spruce forest: estimating the root decomposition and soil moisture effects in a trenching experiment
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4384-5014
2011 (English)In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 104, no 1-3, p. 121-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The two components of soil respiration, autotrophic respiration (from roots, mycorrhizal hyphae and associated microbes) and heterotrophic respiration (from decomposers), was separated in a root trenching experiment in a Norway spruce forest. In June 2003, cylinders (29.7 cm diameter) were inserted to 50 cm soil depth and respiration was measured both outside (control) and inside the trenched areas. The potential problems associated with the trenching treatment, increased decomposition of roots and ectomycorrhizal mycelia and changed soil moisture conditions, were handled by empirical modelling. The model was calibrated with respiration, moisture and temperature data of 2004 from the trenched plots as a training set. We estimate that over the first 5 months after the trenching, 45% of respiration from the trenched plots was an artefact of the treatment. Of this, 29% was a water difference effect and 16% resulted from root and mycelia decomposition. Autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration contributed to about 50% each of total soil respiration in the control plots averaged over the two growing seasons. We show that the potential problems with the trenching, decomposing roots and mycelia and soil moisture effects, can be handled by a modelling approach, which is an alternative to the sequential root harvesting technique.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2011. Vol. 104, no 1-3, p. 121-132
Keywords [en]
Soil moisture, Picea abies, PLS; Root respiration, Root decomposition, Soil temperature
National Category
Natural Sciences Biological Sciences
Research subject
Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17041DOI: 10.1007/s10533-010-9491-9ISI: 000291168900010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79957797951OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-17041DiVA, id: diva2:439281
Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Comstedt, DanielBoström, BjörnEkblad, Alf

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