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Stress, musculoskeletal pain and insomnia: distinct difficulties or variations of the same problem?
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2011. , p. 86
Series
Örebro Studies in Psychology, ISSN 1651-1328 ; 20
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-18838ISBN: 978-91-7668-825-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-18838DiVA, id: diva2:444642
Public defence
2011-11-10, Örebro universitet, Hörsal L3, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Avoidant safety behaviors and catastrophizing: Shared cognitive-behavioral processes and consequences in co-morbid pain and sleep disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avoidant safety behaviors and catastrophizing: Shared cognitive-behavioral processes and consequences in co-morbid pain and sleep disorders
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 201-210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Research and theory suggest that the symptom pair of chronic pain and insomnia may be maintained by shared cognitive-behavioral processes and consequences. Purpose: This investigation describes the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to assess the way people think about symptoms of pain and poor sleep. Method: A pool of 12 items was generated from existing and validated measures. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on item responses from a community sample of respondents who reported having had a problem with pain or sleep (n = 1702) during the three months previous to the survey. Multinomial regression analyses (MRA) were used to describe derived subscale responses for distinct groups reporting different degrees of perceived symptom severity and overlap. Results: EFA suggested the existence of three distinct dimensions: safety behaviors of behavioral orientation, safety behaviors of cognitive orientation, and catastrophizing. MRA analyses indicated that catastrophizing appears to be a shared psychological process and that both types of safety behaviors may be enhanced in co-morbid problems with persistent pain and insomnia. Conclusion: Cognitions pertaining to avoidant safety behaviors and catastrophizing are associated with symptom severity and overlap in co-morbid pain and sleep disorders. More research is needed to explore the importance of shared psychological processes and consequences when studying and treating ill health.

National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3361 (URN)10.1080/10705500802222675 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-12-02 Created: 2008-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
2. Cognitive vulnerability in the development of concomitant pain and sleep disturbances
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive vulnerability in the development of concomitant pain and sleep disturbances
2010 (English)In: British Journal of Health Psychology, ISSN 1359-107X, E-ISSN 2044-8287, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 417-434Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The present study uses a cognitive behavioural framework to explore the idea that people with pain and sleep disturbances share a common cognitive vulnerability. 

Design: A longitudinal classification of people (N=592) in a community sample reporting on symptoms of pain and sleep at baseline, 3 and 12 months after the initial survey. 

Method: Cluster analysis was used to classify people reporting different degrees of symptoms, and their endorsement of cognitive behavioural processes, and consequences at each time point. Groups in similar clusters were linked at adjacent time points to document patterns of stability and change. The clusters are described at baseline on a range of indices not used to form them (problem duration, problem frequency, anxiety, and depression). Reliable change in reports of symptom-related interference was cross tabulated with reliable change in cognitive behavioural processes and consequences.

Results: Cluster analyses resulted in six homogenous and distinct profiles at each time point. Linking the clusters over time showed partial individual stability in cluster membership at adjacent time points. Reliable change in symptom-related interference was associated with reliable change in endorsement of cognitive behavioural processes and consequences on the short term.

Conclusion: The character and partial individual stability of symptom cluster membership suggests that problems with pain and sleep may share mutually maintaining cognitive behavioural processes and consequences. Future research should examine the utility of identifying mutually maintaining factors in the treatment of concomitant pain and sleep disturbances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8921 (URN)10.1348/135910709X468089 (DOI)000277066300012 ()19719905 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-12-23 Created: 2009-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
3. Reconstructing the Past on the Original Pain Recall Assessment Form (OPRA)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconstructing the Past on the Original Pain Recall Assessment Form (OPRA)
2009 (English)In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 809-817Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Original Pain Recall Assessment form (OPRA) is a technique that allows people to report on their pattern of pain over time. This investigation reports on the psychometric properties of the OPRA. Our results are analyzed from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. Correlation analyses on data from 72 respondents indicate that participants' patterns of symptoms recalled on the OPRA over a 28-day period were positively related to previous daily diary reports. Symptom ratings on an adapted OPRA showed different patterns of association with past symptom reports in distinct subgroups. A hypothesized, primacy recency effect of the diary procedure on symptom recall was supported. Statistics designed for use with paired, ordered categorical data showed acceptable agreement between diary ratings and those made at recall. In a basic research setting, the form offers the potential to evaluate individual correlates of pain recall. It can also be used at an individual level to describe the character of disagreement with prior ratings.

Perspective

This article presents the psychometric properties of a pain-assessment procedure. Our results suggest that the way people recall their symptoms is related to cognitive, emotional, and behavioral correlates of the pain experience. The importance of individual differences in overt and covert behaviors and their relationship to persistent pain complaints warrants further attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2009
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8922 (URN)10.1016/j.jpain.2009.03.016 (DOI)000269098100004 ()19638328 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-67650905392 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2009-12-23 Created: 2009-12-23 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
4. Stress, musculoskeletal pain and insomnia: distinct difficulties or variations of the same problem?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress, musculoskeletal pain and insomnia: distinct difficulties or variations of the same problem?
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20467 (URN)
Available from: 2011-12-02 Created: 2011-12-02 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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