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Relationship between dietary exposure and serum perfluorochemical (PFC) levels-A case study
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
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2009 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 712-717Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Daily dietary intake of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in relation to serum levels was assessed by determination of nine PFCs including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in matched daily diet duplicates and serum samples. Diet and serum were collected in year 2004 from 20 women in Osaka and Miyagi, Japan. Only PFOS and PFOA were detected in the diet samples and no significant difference between cities was seen. After adjusted by water content, diet concentration of PFOA was significantly higher in Osaka. The median daily intake calculated using the measured diet concentrations was 1.47 ng PFOS/kg b.w. and 1.28 ng PFOA/kg b.w. for Osaka, and 1.08 ng PFOS/kg b.w. and 0.72 ng PFOA/kg b.w. for Miyagi. A significant difference between cities was seen for the serum concentrations with median of 31 ng/mL PFOS and PFOA in Osaka, compared to 14 ng/mL PFOS and 4.6 ng/mL PFOA in Miyagi. Carboxylates such as perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) were also detected in serum at median levels 6.9 ng/mL and 3.2 ng/mL (Osaka), and 2.8 ng/mL and 5.1 ng/mL (Miyagi). Based on one-compartment model under steady state, dietary intake of PFOS and PFOA accounted for only 22.4% and 23.7% of serum levels in Osaka females, and in contrast 92.5% and 110.6% in Miyagi females, respectively. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 35, no 4, p. 712-717
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Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Chemistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-19256DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2009.01.010ISI: 000265520300006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-19256DiVA, id: diva2:445848
Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-04 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Kärrman, Anna

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