oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Soothing music can increase oxytocin levels during bed rest after open-heart surgery: a randomised control trial
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5403-4183
2009 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, no 15, p. 2153-2161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To evaluate the effect of bed rest with music on relaxation for patients who have undergone heart surgery on postoperative day one. Background. Music intervention has been evaluated as an appropriate nursing intervention to reduce patients 'pain, stress and anxiety levels in several clinical settings, but its effectiveness in increasing patients' subjective and objective relaxation levels has not been examined. Design. A randomised controlled trial. Method. Forty patients undergoing open coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement surgery were randomly allocated to either music listening during bed rest (n = 20) or bed rest only (n = 20). Relaxation was assessed during bed rest the day after surgery by determining the plasma oxytocin, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PaO(2,) SaO(2) and subjective relaxation levels. Results. In the music group, levels of oxytocin increased significantly in contrast to the control group for which the trend over time was negative i.e., decreasing values. Subjective relaxation levels increased significantly more and there were also a significant higher levels of PaO(2) in the music group compared to the control group. There was no difference in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and SaO(2) between the groups. Conclusion. Listening to music during bed rest after open-heart surgery has some effects on the relaxation system as regards s-oxytocin and subjective relaxations levels. This effect seems to have a causal relation from the psychological (music makes patients relaxed) to the physical (oxytocin release). Relevance to clinical practice. Music intervention should be offered as an integral part of the multimodal regime administered to the patients that have undergone cardiovascular surgery. It is a supportive source that increases relaxation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2009. Vol. 18, no 15, p. 2153-2161
Keywords [en]
Coronary artery bypass, Music, Nursing, Oxytocin, Postoperative care, Relaxation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-19202DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2008.02718.xISI: 000267753300006PubMedID: 19583647Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-68149134620OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-19202DiVA, id: diva2:445911
Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-04 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Nilsson, Ulrica

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, Ulrica
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Clinical Nursing
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 46632 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf