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Blogging in the shadow of parties: exploring ideological differences in online campaigning
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7291-2875
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5485-8577
2013 (English)In: Political Communication, ISSN 1058-4609, E-ISSN 1091-7675, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 434-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blogging is an increasingly important practice in election campaigns, showing interesting variations across contexts. Recent research has shown that the adoption and use of blogs is strongly shaped by national institutional settings, that is, the different roles given to parties within political systems. However, intra-national differences in the practice of political blogging are yet to be explained. This article investigates the variation in usage of blogs in electoral campaigns in Sweden, a country characterized by strong political parties and a party-centered form of representative democracy. The central argument is that different parties utilize blogging in different ways. Just as blogging is shaped by how institutions support persons or parties, we propose that political blogging is shaped by party affiliation and ideological positions on individualism and collectivism. The empirical analysis, based on a survey among over 600 bloggingpoliticians, confirms that ideological positions towards individualism and collectivism have a great impact on the uptake and usage of political blogs, portraying political blogging as a strongly ideologically situated practice of political communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013. Vol. 30, no 3, p. 434-455
Keywords [en]
blogging, political parties, individualism, election campaigns
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20043DOI: 10.1080/10584609.2012.737430ISI: 000321986800006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84880583162OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20043DiVA, id: diva2:447890
Available from: 2011-10-13 Created: 2011-10-13 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Åström, JoachimKarlsson, Martin

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf