oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Parent's reactions to adolescents' problematic behaviors
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental research)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0324-8450
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Traditional socialization theories suggest that parents shape their children, and parents’ socialization strategies are decided upon largely independent of the children. These ideas, however, have received criticism. In this dissertation, I focus on how children and adolescents influence their parents’ behaviors. Specifically, I examine parents’ reactions to problematic behaviors in their adolescents. In the three studies, I presented theoretical models that offered explanations why parents react as they do to problematic behaviors in their adolescents. In these models, parents’ cognitions worked as mechanisms to explain their subsequent reactions. The overall pattern in the studies was that parents tended to shift in cognitions about their own role as parents and their adolescents’ behaviors when they were faced with problematic behaviors, which influenced their behaviors toward their adolescents. In Study I, parents became less strictly opposed to adolescent drinking when they encountered their adolescents intoxicated. This reaction was explained by a reduction in dissonance between their attitudes to adolescent drinking and their knowledge of their own adolescents’ drinking. In Study II and Study III, parents of adolescents with hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems (HIA) reported that their adolescents did not respond to their attempts to correct their behaviors. This cognition made them feel powerless and, as a consequence, they increased in negative behaviors and decreased in positive parenting strategies. In these two studies, parents decreased in their thoughts of being able to deal with their adolescents’ misbehaviors. In addition, as was shown in the third study, these cognitions seem to be influenced by parents’ earlier experiences with their first-born children. In sum, the results of this dissertation suggest that adolescents influence their parents’ cognitions and behaviors. Further, the results highlight the importance of focusing on how parents’ ways of thinking influence their parenting strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2011. , p. 71
Series
Örebro Studies in Psychology, ISSN 1651-1328 ; 22
Keyword [en]
Adolescents, problematic behaviors, adolescents' characteristics parents' cognitions, parents' reactions, parenting, parent-child relationship, family system
National Category
Social Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20132ISBN: 978-91-7668-832-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20132DiVA, id: diva2:450425
Public defence
2011-12-16, Hörsal 2 Prismahuset, Örebro universitet, Örebro, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-10-20 Created: 2011-10-20 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. A test of cognitive dissonance theory to explain parents’ reactions to youths’ alcohol intoxication
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A test of cognitive dissonance theory to explain parents’ reactions to youths’ alcohol intoxication
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background:

Studies have shown that parents reduce control and support in response to youths’ drinking. Why they react this way, however, is still much unknown. From cognitive dissonance theory, we derived hypotheses about parents’ reactions.

Methods:

We used a longitudinal, school-based sample of 494 youths (13 and 14 years, 56% boys) and their parents. General Linear Model (GLM) analyses were used to test the main hypotheses.

Results:

In accord with our hypotheses, parents who encountered their youths intoxicated became less opposed to underage drinking over time. In addition, parents who remained strongly opposed to youth drinking experienced more worries than parents who became less opposed. Alternative explanations for the results were tested, but were not supported.

Conclusions:

The findings suggest that to eliminate the dissonance between their strict attitudes against youth drinking and their knowledge of their own youths’ drinking, parents changed their attitudes and became more lenient.

Keyword
cognitive dissonance theory, parental attitudes, youth alcohol intoxication
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20361 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-16 Created: 2011-11-16 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
2. Parents’ reactions to youths’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ reactions to youths’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems
2011 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1125-1135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems(HIA) in children and adolescents are stressful for parents. In this study, we used theories of parents’ perceived power and attributions for youths’ behaviors to develop a model to understand parents’ reactions to their youths’ HIA. We followed 706 youths (376 boys and 330 girls, aged 10–12 years at T1) and their parents in a community-based project over 5 years. Measures of youths’ HIA, youths’ unresponsiveness to correction, parents’ feelings of powerlessness, parental monitoring, and parents’ negative behaviors toward their youths, were used. HIA in youths predicted increases in parents’ perceptions that their youths were unresponsive to correction, which in turn prompted parents to feel more powerless over time. Further, parents’ feelings of powerlessness were associated with increases in negative parenting behaviors over time. These results indicate a movement to more negative parenting practices over time as a result of youths’ HIA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Springer, 2011
Keyword
parental reactions, youths’ HIA, unresponsiveness to correction, parents’ negative behaviors
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20363 (URN)10.1007/s10802-011-9541-3 (DOI)000299927300004 ()21748550 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-82755182910 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-16 Created: 2011-11-16 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved
3. Parents’ reactions to adolescents’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems: do their experiences of having raised a child before matter?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents’ reactions to adolescents’ hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems: do their experiences of having raised a child before matter?
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Parents learn from their experiences of having raised a child before, but it is unknown if it makes them better to deal with challenging behaviors in their later-born children. Some behaviors are particularly difficult to handle, such as Hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attention problems (HIA), which have been shown to make parents feel powerless. In this study, we examined if these feelings were dependent on parents’ experiences with their older children. Two models were examined, the learning-from-experience model and the spillover model, which make different predictions of how parents make use of their earlier experiences when they raise their later-born children. We used reports from 372 parents who had one child (M = 11.92 years), and 198 parents who had two children (M = 11.89 and 14.35 years). In agreement with Bugental’s parental attribution model, HIA was associated with parents’ feelings of powerlessness among parents who both had and those who had not raised a child before. Further, we did not find empirical support for the learning-from-experience model — parents felt powerless about their younger children with HIA even if they had raised a child before with HIA. However, consistent with the spillover hypothesis, parents felt particularly powerless about their younger children with HIA if they also felt powerless about their older children. These findings highlight the importance of acknowledging parents’ experiences with their older children in research and clinical settings.

Keyword
parents’ reactions, adolescents’ HIA, siblings, parents’ feelings of powerlessness
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20364 (URN)
Available from: 2011-11-16 Created: 2011-11-16 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(634 kB)771 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 634 kBChecksum SHA-512
ba98e22ad463624fa05d4acb52a53288fd7e16263df8d7918da6979ca2ea8ac8b0438babd7d2282e8cece177669de85983965a1eb5bed44c209855a11068393e
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf
cover(258 kB)80 downloads
File information
File name COVER01.pdfFile size 258 kBChecksum SHA-512
59ee9a97ccbd8a70440eee7cecd02d4f5c9d87580fcdd8ac41580d49a10467dbc1ed371458df6d45aee91f1a47b2936b5ec9c790d12c4a35e5329d8994272d6c
Type coverMimetype application/pdf
spikblad(118 kB)11 downloads
File information
File name SPIKBLAD01.pdfFile size 118 kBChecksum SHA-512
43a3c6549c8707d656a61efef8cac5bfd7ec28d0ac1e3e138a2be86f322334dce3c858faa05b5a02f059038589058c947634848ec3fce3dcd1e9284f7b4b0f56
Type spikbladMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Glatz, Terese

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Glatz, Terese
By organisation
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work
Social SciencesPsychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 772 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 955 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf