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PE on YouTube: investigating participation i physical education practice
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (SMED)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8748-8843
2013 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 42-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In this article, students’ diverse ways of participating in physical education (PE) practice shown in clips on YouTube were investigated. YouTube is the largest user-generated video sharing website on the Internet, where different video content is presented. The clips on YouTube, as used in this paper, can be seen as a user-generated archive of ongoing PE practices that can enrich our understanding of how students participate in PE, as well as what they participate in.

Purpose: The purpose of the study were to analyse students’ diverse ways of participating in PE in order to say something about its practice.

Research design: A transactional approach, which takes action in ongoing activities as the point of departure, were was used as a theoretical framework, and the sample used consisteds of student- and teacher posted video clips from 285 PE lessons in 27 different countries.

Data analysis: In the analysis, students’ and teachers’ actions-in-ongoing-events were explored in terms of how they participate in the sociocultural practice of PE in terms of students’ and teachers’ habits-of-action. In this way, PE as a sociocultural practice can be investigated. In the analysis students’ and teachers’ actions-in-ongoing-events were coded in terms of how they participated in ways that were stable or ‘normal’, and which made the situation become stable.

Findings: In transactional studies an effort is put forth to empirically describing and categorising the results of the analysis from the functions the actions constitute in a certain situation. In this study this implied categorising how actions, in the constant flow of actions, contributed to other actions being oriented in a specific direction in a certain situation, including both spoken and embodied actions in the studied event. Three Four major themes emerged from the analysis; Doing sport, Trying and having fun, and Training fitness, and two minor themes Warming up, and Dancing emerged from the analysis. Each theme describes how students and teachers participate and how they through their participation shape the content of PE practice.

Conclusion: Questions of knowledge in PE can be seen as manifested in students’ and teachers’ ways of being and acting, as well as their ability to participate in the ongoing PE practices. By using a transactional approach the study explored how PE practice is established, maintained and shaped through students’ and teachers’ actions-in-context. The consequences of the study indicate that PE and what is regarded as relevant knowledge in PE practice can be constituted in several different ways. PE is about diverse ways of participating, and in this diversity PE is constituted in a manifold of ways in its practice. These participatory processes contribute to the constitution of PE as a socio-cultural practice, and students know PE practice through these processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2013. Vol. 18, no 1, p. 42-59
Keywords [en]
Participation, student, voice, practice, habit, transaction
National Category
Social Sciences Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Sports Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20162DOI: 10.1080/17408989.2011.631000ISI: 000312295900004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84871263350OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20162DiVA, id: diva2:450925
Available from: 2011-10-24 Created: 2011-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Quennerstedt, Mikael

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