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Effects of physical training on physical performance in institutionalised elderly patients (70+) with multiple diagnoses
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1592-8835
2004 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: the positive effect of physical training in healthy elderly people is well documented. The aim of this systematic review was to describe the effect of physical training on physical performance in institutionalised elderly patients with multiple diagnoses.

DESIGN: systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials regarding effects of physical training of elderly (70+) subjects.

METHODS: the randomised controlled trials were evaluated using a modified version of an evaluation form originally developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. It is based on a weighted scale of 0-100 points, and ranks the studies as high, moderate or low methodological quality. A total of 16 randomised controlled trials were included in the review.

RESULTS: six studies scored as high quality, eight as moderate and two as low. There was a large heterogeneity in the studies concerning sample size, types of interventions and types of assessments. There is strong evidence for a positive effect of physical training on muscle strength and mobility; moderate evidence for an effect on range of motion; and contradictory evidence regarding gait, activities of daily living, balance and endurance.

CONCLUSION: more studies are required, with larger sample sizes, higher specificity as to the types of interventions and assessments, greater focus on clinically relevant outcomes such as endurance and activities of daily living, and also, for example, quality of life and mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 33, no 1, p. 13-23
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20207DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afh001PubMedID: 14870716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20207DiVA, id: diva2:452899
Available from: 2011-10-31 Created: 2011-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Akner, Gunnar

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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