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Elderly peoples' meals: a comparative study between elderly living in a nursing home and frail, self-managing elderly
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1592-8835
2006 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Sweden is one of few countries that have specific recommendations regarding mealtime habits. The importance of mealtime habits for health outcome is inadequately studied in elderly subjects.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of the daily meals/energy intake; the number of eating episodes per day and subjectively estimated meal-dependent variables (appetite, motivation to eat, sense of taste and sense of smell) and compare the results of elderly living in a nursing home with frail, self-managing elderly living at home.

DESIGN: Explorative study. All analyses of energy intake were based on food records; weighed in the nursing home and estimated in the frail, self-managing elderly. Participants or contact persons estimated the subjective variables using a 10-point VAS scale.

RESULTS: On average there were 4-5 daily eating episodes in both groups. The eating episodes were much more widespread over the day in the self-managing elderly, and their length of fasting at night was significantly shorter. The subjects estimated appetite and sense of smell was reduced in about 30-40% in both groups. Sense of taste was reduced in 40 % of the males and 10-20 % of the females. Energy intake was similar in both groups, 25 kcal/kg body weight/day, with more than a threefold variation among individual subjects. Energy intake/kg body weight correlated with a shorter length of fasting at night in the nursing home residents, however, did not correlate with ADL, number of eating episodes per day, appetite, motivation to eat, or senses of taste or smell.

CONCLUSION: The self-managing elderly had more widespread eating episodes than the elderly in the nursing home, indicating that self-managing elderly exhibit larger variations in food intake preferences, however, without affecting mean energy intake. The lack of correlation between energy intake and estimated appetite, taste and smell is in line with previous findings in elderly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 10, no 2, p. 96-102
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20200PubMedID: 16554940OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20200DiVA, id: diva2:452909
Available from: 2011-10-31 Created: 2011-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Akner, Gunnar

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