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Resting metabolic rate in elderly nursing home patients with multiple diagnoses
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1592-8835
2006 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In the diseased elderly weight loss and malnutrition are common. It is unclear to what degree this is caused by an elevated resting metabolic rate (RMR), a decreased energy intake or a combination of the two.

OBJECTIVE: To measure RMR and nutrient induced thermogenesis (NIT) in chronically diseased elderly living in a nursing home and test for a correlation with fat free mass (FFM), age, energy intake and activities of daily living (ADL).

DESIGN: Explorative study performed in the residents' own apartments. RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry, and NIT was tested by giving the subjects an oral fluid test meal, then measuring metabolic rate again one hour later. Body composition was measured anthropometrically and FFM was calculated. Energy intake was calculated from a five-day record of weighed food. BMR was calculated using four different prediction equations and compared with measured RMR. Results: RMR was 1,174 kcal/d (29.3 kcal/kg FFM/d). The variation in RMR was significantly related to FFM (p < 0.0001). Energy intake was 1,474 kcal/d, (36.5 kcal/kg FFM/d). The energy intake/RMR ratio, was 1.27, and NIT was 15% (0-33%). NIT was not correlated to any of the parameters tested. The equation of Harris and Benedict underestimated BMR by 4%; the WHO/FAO overestimated BMR by 7%; Schofield and an estimate of 20 kcal/kg/d did not significantly differ from the measured mean.

CONCLUSION: RMR was closely correlated to FFM. Variations in NIT could not be explained by any tested parameters. Predicted BMR differed from measured RMR by less than 8% in all methods, but individual variations were large.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 10, no 4, p. 263-270
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics
Research subject
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-20198PubMedID: 16886096OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-20198DiVA, id: diva2:452912
Available from: 2011-10-31 Created: 2011-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Akner, Gunnar

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