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Alcohol use and friendship dynamics: selection and socialization in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7546-2275
2012 (English)In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study examined developmental trends of peer selection and socialization related to friends' alcohol use in early-, middle-, and late-adolescent peer networks, with the primary goal of identifying when these mechanisms emerge, when these mechanisms exert their strongest effects, and when (or if) they decrease in importance. Gender and reciprocity are also tested as moderators of selection and socialization.

Method: Cross-sequential study (three age cohorts assessed at three annual measurements) of 950 youth (53% male) initially attending classrooms in Grade 4 (n = 314; M = 10.1 years), Grade 7 (n = 335; M = 13.1 years), and Grade 10 (n = 301; M = 16.2 years).

Results: Similarity between friends' drinking behaviors emerged in Grade 6, peaked in Grade 8, and decreased throughout late adolescence. Adolescents in all three age groups selected peers with similar drinking behaviors, with effects being more robust for early-adolescent males and for late-adolescent females. Peers' alcohol use emerged as a significant predictor of middle-adolescent alcohol use and remained a significant predictor of individual drinking behaviors throughout late adolescence. Socialization did not differ as a function of gender or reciprocity.

Conclusions: Alcohol-related peer selection was relatively more important than socialization in early-adolescent friendship networks; both mechanisms contributed to explaining similarity between the drinking behaviors of friends in middle and late adolescence. Effects of peer socialization emerged in middle adolescence and remained throughout late adolescence. (J Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 73, 89-98, 2012)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Rutgers University, 2012. Vol. 73, no 1, p. 89-98
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-21402ISI: 000298898400013PubMedID: 22152666Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-83455163975OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-21402DiVA, id: diva2:485796
Available from: 2012-01-30 Created: 2012-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Burk, William J.Kerr, MargaretStattin, Håkan

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