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Domestic services in a "land of equality": the case of Sweden
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3447-424X
2011 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, ISSN 0832-8781, E-ISSN 1911-0235, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 121-139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For about two generations, paid domestic work was very rare in Sweden and the disappearance of domestic work from private households was widely considered to be important from anequalityperspective. In the past two decades, the demand for householdserviceshas increased, however, due to the decline in institutional and social services and an increasing wage differential. At the same time, globalization, particularly the enlargement of the European Union, has led to increased access to labour from countries with considerably lower wages than Sweden. In this article, the historical background of today's regulation of paid domestic work in Sweden is described. The existing governance of paid domestic work is then analyzed with respect to how it produces inequality and diversity through deregulation, individualization, and privatization. Further, the existing Swedish regulation is discussed from the perspectiveofrights and access to justice, utilizing some key elementsofthe proposed Conventionofthe International Labour Organization. Regulation and protection of domestic work result in the improvement of conditions in the short term, but it is my belief that the way to banish inequality and vulnerability in the long term must be the collectivizationofdomestictasks and also the equal sharingofsuch tasks between women and men. Such changes, however, must involveawider selectionofsociety, includingagenerous provisionofgood public childcare, socialservicesand health care, parental leave shared by women and men, and abo genderequalityin wages and income tax regulation. Finally, it requires that everybody who is physically capable of cleaning should take this task on for themselves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 23, no 1, p. 121-139
Keywords [en]
Domestic work, regulation, decent work, household services
National Category
Law
Research subject
Law
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-21881DOI: 10.3138/cjwl.23.1.121OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-21881DiVA, id: diva2:506402
Available from: 2012-02-28 Created: 2012-02-28 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved

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Calleman, Catharina

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf