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The mediational role of perceived stress in the relation between optimism and burnout in competitive athletes
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7456-2397
2012 (English)In: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, ISSN 1061-5806, E-ISSN 1477-2205, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 183-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Burnout has been highlighted as an important issue, not only in occupational settings but also among athletes. Optimists appear to be more resistant to burnout, which might be partly explained by lower levels of stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between optimism and burnout symptoms in 217 athletes (139 males and 78 females, aged 16 to 19 years), while also examining stress as a mediator in this relationship. The results showed that optimism had a significant negative relationship with both stress and burnout. Mediation analyses indicated that perceived stress fully mediated the links between optimism and two symptoms of burnout, emotional/physical exhaustion and sport devaluation, and partly mediated the link between optimism and a third symptom, reduced sense of accomplishment. The findings indicate that individual factors, such as optimism, may play an important role in the development of burnout by virtue of their association with stress. Future research should, therefore, investigate the longitudinal effects of optimism on stress and burnout.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon, United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis, 2012. Vol. 25, no 2, p. 183-199
Keywords [en]
Coaching, elite athletes, overtraining, stress management, positive psychology, youth sport
National Category
Psychology Neurology
Research subject
Psychology; Sports Science; Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22133DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2011.594045ISI: 000300195200005PubMedID: 21726158Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84860765632OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-22133DiVA, id: diva2:510512
Available from: 2012-03-16 Created: 2012-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, HenrikSkoog, Therese

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School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, SwedenSchool of Law, Psychology and Social Work
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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