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Oestrogen receptor ss in NSCLC: prevalence, proliferative influence, prognostic impact and smoking
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2317-5738
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Thoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6881-237X
2012 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 120, no 6, p. 451-458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) there are gender differences. The female gender is associated with more adenocarcinomas (ADCA), among both smokers and non-smokers compared to men. Women with NSCLC have a better prognosis compared to men, regardless of other factors. A possible role for oestrogen receptor (ER) signalling has been proposed. The role for ER beta in NSCLC is still not clear, especially concerning the impact of smoking. In a material of NSCLC (n = 262), ER beta and cyclins A1 and A2 were studied by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue. In 137 of those cases, frozen material was available, on which expression analysis of ESR2 (ER beta) and cyclin A1 were performed. Data were correlated to histology, gender, smoking habits, stage and clinical outcome. ER beta was expressed in 86% of the cases. ER beta was most frequently expressed in Stage I ADCAs, especially in male subjects. A correlation between ER beta expression and cyclins was observed in ADCA, also with a male predominance. ER beta transcripts had a positive prognostic impact in ADCA. ER beta transcripts were increased in NSCLC among smokers compared to non-smokers. In conclusion, our data support a role for ER beta in lung ADCAs, proposing a role for ER beta in lungcarcinogenesis, especially among smokers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012. Vol. 120, no 6, p. 451-458
Keywords [en]
NSCLC, ER ss, immunohistochemistry, gene expression, gender, prognosis, smoking habits
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Immunology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-23051DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0463.2011.02850.xISI: 000303978500003PubMedID: 22583357Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84861012859OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-23051DiVA, id: diva2:529647
Available from: 2012-05-31 Created: 2012-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Karlsson, ChristinaHelenius, GiselaKarlsson, Mats G.

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