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The protective effect of supplemental calcium on colonic permeability depends on a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity
TI Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Health, NIZO Food Research, Ede, The Netherlands.
Department of Health, NIZO Food Research, Ede, The Netherlands.
TI Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Health, NIZO Food Research, Ede, The Netherlands.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0362-0008
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2012 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 107, no 7, p. 950-956Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increased intestinal permeability is associated with several diseases. Previously, we have shown that dietary Ca decreases colonic permeability in rats. This might be explained by a calcium-phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity, which protects against an acidic pH due to microbial fermentation. Therefore, we investigated whether dietary phosphate is a co-player in the effect of Ca on permeability. Rats were fed a humanised low-Ca diet, or a similar diet supplemented with Ca and containing either high, medium or low phosphate concentrations. Chromium-EDTA was added as an inert dietary intestinal permeability marker. After dietary adaptation, short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) were added to all diets to stimulate fermentation, acidify the colonic contents and induce an increase in permeability. Dietary Ca prevented the scFOS-induced increase in intestinal permeability in rats fed medium- and high-phosphate diets but not in those fed the low-phosphate diet. This was associated with higher faecal water cytotoxicity and higher caecal lactate levels in the latter group. Moreover, food intake and body weight during scFOS supplementation were adversely affected by the low-phosphate diet. Importantly, luminal buffering capacity was higher in rats fed the medium- and high-phosphate diets compared with those fed the low-phosphate diet. The protective effect of dietary Ca on intestinal permeability is impaired if dietary phosphate is low. This is associated with a calcium phosphate-induced increase in luminal buffering capacity. Dragging phosphate into the colon and thereby increasing the colonic phosphate concentration is at least part of the mechanism behind the protective effect of Ca on intestinal permeability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Vol. 107, no 7, p. 950-956
Keywords [en]
Calcium, Phosphate, Short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides, Intestinal permeability
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-23361DOI: 10.1017/S0007114511003977ISI: 000304126500003PubMedID: 21851756Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84863576181OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-23361DiVA, id: diva2:532318
Note

Funding Agency:

TI Food and Nutrition (Wageningen, The Netherlands)

Available from: 2012-06-11 Created: 2012-06-11 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Brummer, Robert

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