oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Perceived parenting style and adolescent adjustment: revisiting directions of effects and the role of parental knowledge
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7546-2275
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. (Center for Developmental Research)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7009-5955
2012 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1540-1553Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present research on parenting and adolescent behavior, there is much focus on reciprocal, bidirectional, and transactional processes, but parenting-style research still adheres to a unidirectional perspective in which parents affect youth behavior but are unaffected by it. In addition, many of the most cited parenting-style studies have used measures of parental behavioral control that are questionable because they include measures of parental knowledge. The goals of this study were to determine whether including knowledge items might have affected results of past studies and to test the unidirectional assumption. Data were from 978 adolescents participating in a longitudinal study. Parenting-style and adolescent adjustment measures at 2 time points were used, with a 2-year interval between time points. A variety of internal and external adjustment measures were used. Results showed that including knowledge items in measures of parental behavioral control elevated links between behavioral control and adjustment. Thus, the results and conclusions of many of the most highly cited studies are likely to have been stronger than if the measures had focused strictly on parental behavior. In addition, adolescent adjustment predicted changes in authoritative and neglectful parenting styles more robustly than these styles predicted changes in adolescent adjustment. Adolescent adjustment also predicted changes in authoritativeness more robustly than authoritativeness predicted changes in adjustment. Thus, parenting style cannot be seen as independent of the adolescent. In summary, both the theoretical premises of parenting-style research and the prior findings should be revisited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2012. Vol. 48, no 6, p. 1540-1553
Keywords [en]
parenting style; authoritative parenting; internalizing and externalizing problems; disclosure; parental knowledge
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24485DOI: 10.1037/a0027720ISI: 000310557800003PubMedID: 22448987Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84874298620OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-24485DiVA, id: diva2:544876
Available from: 2012-08-16 Created: 2012-08-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Kerr, MargaretStattin, HåkanÖzdemir, Metin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kerr, MargaretStattin, HåkanÖzdemir, Metin
By organisation
School of Law, Psychology and Social Work
In the same journal
Developmental Psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 594 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf