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Pet work in prevention - a review
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
2011 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

People, through history, have always benefited from the relationship with animals. On a preventative perspective this relationship shares a great potential in universal, selective, and indicated prevention. In regard to the general population, the presence of a pet appear to benefit pet-owners’ well-being, with important implications for the public care policy. On selective and indicated prevention, animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) with subgroups sharing higher levels of risk than the general population (e.g. cancer patients, hospitalized children, nursing home residents, and inmates) and with individuals at risk for chronic maladjustment look promising. The studies analyzed in the present review are extremely varied and include diverse types of settings and participants, from children to older adults, from the general population to individuals with special needs. The results of the various studies explored move towards a positive direction for pets to work in prevention. Yet, this quite young field of research needs to improve the empirical support, develop a coherent theoretical framework, and fulfill its interdisciplinary nature through the collaboration of the different disciplines involved. Moreover, national public health surveys should include questions regarding pet-ownership to clarify the relationship between pet-ownership and well-being, and consequently adjust the public health policy. While AAIs, reinforced by the current knowledge, should persist, integrating quantitative investigation into the practice, to improve and refine the programs’ outlines. In conclusion, what can certainly be affirmed is that the human-animal connection deserves the attention needed to reach these goals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. , p. 51
Keywords [en]
Prevention, Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs), human-animal connection, pet-ownership, well-being.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25494ISRN: ORU-JPS/PSY-AG-2012/0019--SEArchive number: ORU-JPS/PSY-AG-2012/0019--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-25494DiVA, id: diva2:547752
Subject / course
Psykologi
Uppsok
Social and Behavioural Science, Law
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2012-08-31 Created: 2012-08-28 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf