oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Neonatal sepsis, antibiotic therapy and later risk of asthma and allergy
Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Women's and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 88-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

P>Sobko T, Schiott J, Ehlin A, Lundberg J, Montgomery S, Norman M. Neonatal sepsis, antibiotic therapy and later risk of asthma and allergy. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2010; 24: 88-92. Neonatal sepsis and early antibiotic therapy affect bacterial colonisation and immune activation after birth. This could have implications for later risk of allergy and asthma. Using a validated questionnaire (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children, ISAAC), we screened for asthma and allergy in three cohorts (total n = 834; median age 12, range 7-23 years) with different perinatal exposures as regards infection and antibiotics. Asthma, but not hay fever, was more prevalent after neonatal sepsis with adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04, 2.56] and early antibiotic therapy (OR 1.48 [0.93, 2.35]) as compared with a control group. There was a trend towards increased atopic eczema after neonatal sepsis (OR = 1.39 [CI = 0.98, 1.98]). We conclude that neonatal sepsis is associated with an increased risk for later development of asthma. Early antibiotic exposure may contribute to this association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 24, no 1, p. 88-92
Keywords [en]
neonatal infection, hygiene hypothesis, antibiotics, eczema, asthma, hay fever
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-25551DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3016.2009.01080.xISI: 000273180300011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-25551DiVA, id: diva2:548070
Available from: 2012-08-29 Created: 2012-08-29 Last updated: 2018-07-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Montgomery, Scott M.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Montgomery, Scott M.
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 398 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf