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Occupational therapists' practice patterns for clients having cognitive impairments following acquired brain injury
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5418-3154
2012 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 458-459Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Studies have shown that occupational therapy interventions for clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury (CIABI) have a positive effect on performance of activities of daily living, although the exact nature of the interventions are not clearly described. A better understanding of current practice is therefore needed to move further in the search for evidence based occupational therapy for clients with CIABI. Research on occupational therapists’ (OTs’) practice can play an important role to explore and describe current practice and furthermore define and evaluate the effectiveness of different components in OT interventions. The aim of this study was to survey Swedish OTs’ practice patterns for clients having CIABI.

Methods: The study had a cross-sectional design using a questionnaire developed in two former studies. A stratified random sample was done with 250 OTs each from the following areas: regional care, somatic county care, primary care and municipal eldercare. The questionnaire was sent out using on-line survey software and 462 participants responded. Data is currently analyzed by descriptive and comparative statistics.

Results: Preliminary results show that the interventions targeted a wide range of cognitive impairments and its consequences. Interventions were both remedial and compensatory with graded activity as the most common remediating intervention. To compensate for activity limitations prescription, or recommendation, of assistive devices (AD) as well as supporting clients in finding internal strategies were used extensively. The ADs used consisted of both high and low technology devices. Eighty-two percent also included different specific interventions to improve clients’ decreased self-awareness in their practice. A vast majority of the OTs (94%) preferred to use observations in daily activities to assess both activity limitations and cognitive impairment. Almost all participants also used interviews and sixty-two percent used tests on impairment level. To support practice general Occupational Therapy models were widely used while theories focusing on cognitive impairments specifically were used less. The participants’ answers reflected a client-centered attitude with collaborative goal-setting and feedback discussions after each session. Eighty- four percent felt dependent on relatives to reach a successful outcome and most of them worked deliberately to involve relatives in the rehabilitation. The OTs responses were evenly distributed over the spheres of activity. Ninety-two percent of the participants worked in team and the most common diagnoses were stroke and traumatic brain injury. There were some differences in responses between the spheres.

Conclusions: Preliminary conclusions are that the OTs practice patterns included interventions targeting most cognitive impairments and their consequences in daily activities. The use of daily activities as a mean was preferred irrespective of whether the interventions were remediative or compensatory. Interventions targeting decreased self-awareness as well as the use of ADs were common. A client-centered approach was dominating including collaboration with relatives.

For personal

centered approach was dominating including collaboration

with relatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2012. Vol. 26, no 4-5, p. 458-459
Keywords [en]
occupational therapy, cognition, stroke, TBI, intervention, practice
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Research subject
Occupational therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-26396DOI: 10.3109/02699052.2012.660091ISI: 000304104600274OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-26396DiVA, id: diva2:566697
Conference
International Brain Injury Association's Ninth World Congress on Brain Injury, Edingburgh, Scotland, UK, March 21-25.
Available from: 2012-11-09 Created: 2012-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Holmqvist, KajsaIvarsson, Ann-BrittHolmefur, Marie

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School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
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