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Bicycling to school is associated with improvements in physical fitness over a 6-year follow-up period in Swedish children
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
Department of Physical Education and Sport, School of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolinat, Chapel Hill NC, United States; Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC, United States.
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2012 (English)In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 108-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether modes of commuting to school at baseline and changes in commuting were related to 6-year changes in cardiorespiratory fitness in youth.

METHODS: A total of 262 (142 girls) Swedish children (9 years at entry) were measured at baseline (1998/9) and follow-up (2004/5). Mode of commuting to school was assessed by questionnaire and fitness by a maximal bicycle test.

RESULTS: At baseline, 34% of children used passive modes of commuting (e.g., car, motorcycle, bus, train), 54% walked, and 12% bicycled to school. Six years later the percentage of bicyclists increased 19% and the percentage of walkers decreased 19%. On average, children who bicycled to school increased their fitness 13% (p=0.03) more than those who used passive modes and 20% (p=0.002) more than those who walked. Children who used passive modes or walked at baseline and bicycled to school at 6 years later increased their fitness 14% (p=0.001) more than those who remained using passive modes or walking at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementing initiatives that encourage bicycling to school may be a useful strategy to increase cardiorespiratory fitness of children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 55, no 2, p. 108-112
Keywords [en]
Bicycling; Walking; Fitness
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27129DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.05.019ISI: 000307088800005PubMedID: 22683705Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84863782739OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-27129DiVA, id: diva2:601772
Note

Funding Agencies:

Stockholm County Council

Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation RYC-2010-05957  RYC-2011-09011

Available from: 2013-01-30 Created: 2013-01-29 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved

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Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita

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