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Psychosocial work environment among Swedish audiologists
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded).

Design: A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data.

Study sample: Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists.

Results: Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work environment and is considered a reward in itself. Using the demand-control model, 29% of the audiologists reported working in a high-stress psychosocial work environment. Using the ERI-ratio to estimate the imbalance between effort and reward it was shown that that 86% of the participants experienced an unfavorable work situation where the rewards do not correspond to the efforts made.

Conclusions: The organizational framework has minor effect on self-reported psychosocial work environment for Swedish licensed audiologists. The percentage of unfavorable ERI-ratios seen in Swedish audiologists seems conspicuously high compared to other working populations in general, but also compared to other health service workers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013. Vol. 52, no 3, p. 151-161
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27283DOI: 10.3109/14992027.2012.743045ISI: 000314697400003PubMedID: 23216266Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84873928693OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-27283DiVA, id: diva2:603003
Note

Funding agency:

Swedish Association of Audiologists (Svenska Audionomforeningen) 

Available from: 2013-02-04 Created: 2013-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Båsjö, Sara

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf